Kristin Anderson Moore

Kristin Anderson Moore

Senior Scholar and Past President, Bethesda, MD

Areas Of Expertise

, , ,

Education & Certification

Ph.D., Social Psychology, University of Michigan

Kristin Anderson Moore, Ph.D., is an internationally recognized social psychologist with more than 40 years of experience monitoring, studying, and evaluating child and family well-being. Dr. Moore has published several books, including, What Do Children Need to Flourish? Conceptualizing and Measuring Indicators of Positive Development (2005) and Well-being: Positive Development across the Life Course (2003). She has also contributed prolifically to academic journals for decades. She has received awards from Healthy Teen Network (Researcher of the Year, 2010), the National Council on Family Relations (Fellow, 2013) and the American Sociological Association (William Foote Whyte Award, 2009; Distinguished Career Achievement Award for the Practice of Sociology, 2018), among other citations, and she has testified before varied Congressional committees on issues pertaining to children, youth and families.

Dr. Moore is trained as a survey researcher and has worked on numerous federal surveys, as well as surveys designed for evaluation studies. Her current work includes an evaluation of youthCONNECT in Prince George’s County in Maryland, development of the Social Genome Model, a study of positive youth development in five Generation Work communities, and development of a Healthy and Ready to Learn measure for children ages 3-5 in the National Survey of Children’s Health. She led two studies of integrated student supports and co-directed development of El Camino, an intervention to reduce teen pregnancy while enhancing educational engagement.

Dr. Moore combines her expertise in youth development, evaluation, and survey design to work with programs that seek to become evidence-based, and regularly presents workshops on the topic. She is passionate about positive youth development, the effects of climate change on children and families, indicators of child well-being, poverty and inequality, as well as developing useful logic models, conceptual frameworks, and evaluation designs for programs that are looking for ways to better serve their clients and communities.