Program

Mar 16, 2007

OVERVIEW

The Who Do You Tell program is a sexual abuse prevention
program for elementary school students. The program is designed to give
participants information and the skills necessary to identify and respond to
unwanted touch. Experimental evaluations show that the program is
effective in increasing children’s’ knowledge of appropriate and inappropriate
touch and how to differentiate the two.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: Elementary school
students from first grade through sixth grade

The
Who Do You Tell program was designed by the Calgary Communities Against Sexual
Assault. It is offered in elementary schools at the request of the
principal. The program consists of two sessions presented on consecutive
days. Each session lasts between 45 minutes and an hour. The
sessions are conducted in small groups of 15 to 20 children and taught with two
trainers. The trainers teach children through the use of short videos,
pictures, role-plays and discussions. Prior to the beginning of the
program, there is also an information evening held for the parents where
training for parents is provided on how to proceed if children disclose about
inappropriate touching. There are also different formats of the
curriculum used for the youngest children (kindergarten through 2nd
grade), the middle grades (3rd and 4th grades), and older
children (5th and 6th grade). These different
formats are used to make sure that children have age appropriate material and
videos.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Tutty, L.M. (1997). Child sexual abuse prevention programs: Evaluating
Who Do You Tell. Child Abuse and Neglect, 21(9), 869-881.

Evaluated population: 231 Canadian
children were randomly assigned to participate in either the Who Do You Tell
program or a control condition. 117 children received the Who Do You Tell
program while 114 children were in the control condition.

Approach: The researcher measured outcomes using several questionnaires administered
to children. To measure knowledge about abuse prevention concepts, the
researchers used the Children’s Knowledge of Abuse Questionnaire-Revised
(CKAQ-R). The CKAQ-R consists of 33-items and was administered verbally
to children. The researcher also used the 9-item Appropriate Touch Scale
and the 24-item Inappropriate Touch Scale to measure children’s’ knowledge of
appropriate and inappropriate touch. Demographic information and parental
feedback were also collected.

Results: Data were analyzed using an ANCOVA design controlling for pre-test scores.
Results of the study indicated that while both experimental and control group
members increased their knowledge about abuse prevention concepts, children in
the experimental group had significantly higher scores on the CKAQ-R than their
control counterparts. Results also indicated that children in the
experimental group significantly increased their knowledge of appropriate and inappropriate
touch. The researchers stated that parents were supportive of the
program. Although the researchers concluded that the program produced
significant gains, the magnitude of those gains was rather small. To be more
effective, researchers suggest a more powerful implementation of the program.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References:

Tutty,
L.M. (1997). Child sexual abuse prevention programs: Evaluating Who Do You
Tell. Child Abuse and Neglect, 21(9), 869-881.

Website:
http://calgarycasa.com/programs/who-do-you-tell

Program
categorized in this guide according to the following:

Evaluated participant ages: Grades 1-6 / Program age
ranges in the Guide: 6-11

Program components: parent or family component, school-based

Measured outcomes: life skills

KEYWORDS: Middle Childhood (6-11), Children,
Elementary School, School-based, Parent or Family Component, White or
Caucasian, Asian, Hispanic or Latino, Black, Life Skills Training,
Social/Emotional Health.

Program
information last updated 3/16/07

Subscribe to Child Trends

Short weekly updates of recent research on children and youth.