Program

Nov 09, 2010

OVERVIEW

Too Good for Violence (TGFV) is an interactive classroom
intervention program for grades K-12 that employs cooperative learning, role
playing, and skill building to reduce violent, anti-social behavior and increase
social competency and healthy development. Results of a random assignment
evaluation among third-graders reported more positive perceptions of their
emotional competency and social and resistance skills along with more effective
communication skills for TGFV participants than those in a control group.
Positive impacts were sustained at a 20-week follow-up. A statistically
significant difference was not found between treatment and control groups for
teacher reports of inappropriate behaviors following the study. A second
evaluation found positive impacts on emotional competency skills, social and
conflict resolution skills, communication skills, and prosocial behaviors of
participants in the TGFV program. The program was not found to reduce antisocial
behavior or increase positive perceptions of their interactions with others.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: K-12 students

TGFV is a school-based program for K-12 students designed
to decrease violent and anti-social/aggressive behavior while increasing social
and emotional competence. To accomplish this, the TGFV curricula focus on
developing (a) conflict resolution skills, (b) anger management skills, (c)
respect for self and others, and (d) effective communication skills.

TGFV consists of seven 30- to 60-minute lessons per grade
for k-5, nine 30- to 45-minute lessons for grades 6 to 8, and fourteen 60-minute
lessons for grades 9 to 12. Lessons focused on information sharing and skill
development. Students are taught the negative consequences of violence and
norms of violence among youth. They also develop pro-social, communication,
conflict resolution, social and conflict resolution skills through role-playing
and observation.

Implementation costs range from $1,000 to $5,000 depending
on training needs and the size of school district or school.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Hall, B.W., & Bacon, T.P. (3005). Building a foundation
against violence: Impact of a school-based prevention program on elementary
students. Journal of School Violence, 4,63-83.

Evaluated population: From a large school district
in Florida, 999 third grade students and 46 teachers participated in the study.
Students were 44% white, 12.5% African American, 36% Hispanic, 5% multiracial,
2% Asian, and 0.5% American Indian. Seventeen percent were rated as having
limited English proficiency, and 54% of the students received free or reduced
lunches.

Approach: Schools were stratified according to
school location (urban, suburban, rural) and school ratings, which was based on
academic performance, learning environment, and student characteristics. Within
each of the five strata identified, schools were matched and then randomly
assigned to the program or control condition. Student outcomes were measured
using the Teacher Checklist of Students Behavior, which solicited
information about students’ social adaptability from teachers for each of their
students. The Student Protective Factor Survey Questionnaire was
administered to students to determine the child’s resiliency to social
challenges. These measures were completed as a pretest, post-test, and 20-week
follow-up.

Results: Compared with those in the control group,
students who participated in the TGFV intervention reported significantly more
positive perceptions of their emotional competency skills and more social skills
and more frequent engagement in prosocial behaviors at the post-test and at a
20-week follow-up. These results were confirmed by teacher reports.

Bacon, T. (2003). Technical report: The effects of
the Too Good for Violence prevention program on student behavior and protective
factors.
Tampa, FL: C.E. Mendez Foundation, Inc.

Evaluated population: Nine hundred and ninety-nine
third grade students from ten randomly selected elementary schools in a large
Florida school district served as the sample. The sample was 48 percent female,
44 percent white, 12.5 percent African American, 36 percent Hispanic, 5 percent
multiracial, 2 percent Asian, and 0.5 percent American Indian. Fifty-four
percent of the students received free or reduced price lunch, 20 percent
received exceptional education services, and 17 percent had limited English
language proficiency.

Approach: Schools were matched according to location
(urban, suburban, rural), academic performance, learning environment, and
student characteristics. Within each pair, one school was randomly assigned to
the treatment condition and the other to the control condition. Data were
collected at pre-test, post-test, and 20-week follow-up in the form of teacher
checklists on students’ social skills, prosocial behaviors, and inappropriate
social behaviors and student surveys on emotional competency skills, social and
conflict resolution skills, communication skills, and perceptions of
interactions with others. The attrition rate for teacher checklists was 9
percent.

Results: Student surveys demonstrated that students
in the schools that were assigned to the treatment condition had significantly
higher emotional competency skills, social and conflict resolution skills, and
communication skills compared with students at the control schools at post-test
and follow-up. However, there were no differences in interactions with others.
Teacher checklists confirmed that students at the treatment schools had
significantly higher social skills, and also found that they engaged in more
prosocial behaviors at post-test and follow-up compared with students at the
control schools. However, there was no difference between treatment and control
students in inappropriate social behaviors.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

Website:

http://www.mendezfoundation.org/too-good/Too-Good-for-Violence-K-8.php

References:

Bacon, T. (2003). Technical report: The effects of the
Too Good for Violence prevention program on student behavior and protective
factors.
Tampa, FL: C.E. Mendez Foundation, Inc.

Hall, B.W., & Bacon, T.P. (3005). Building a foundation
against violence: Impact of a school-based prevention program on elementary
students. Journal of School Violence, 4,63-83.

KEYWORDS: Middle Childhood (6-11), Adolescence
(12-17), School-based, Children (3-11), Adolescents (12-17), Tobacco Use,
Conflict Resolution Skills, Self Esteem, Aggression/Bullying, Manual

Program information last updated 11/9/2010.

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