Program

Feb 24, 2010

OVERVIEW

Too Good for Drugs
is a drug prevention program for middle school students that focuses on
increasing resistance skills, communication skills, knowledge about the
consequences of drugs, and knowledge about the prevalence of drug use. This
random assignment study found significant decreases in intention to use alcohol,
tobacco, and marijuana use among the students randomly assigned to the treatment
group.

DESCRIPTION OF
PROGRAM

Target
Population: 
Middle school students

Too Good for Drugs
is an alcohol, tobacco, and other illicit drug prevention program designed to
develop (1) resistance skills towards drugs, (2) goal-setting, decision-making,
assertiveness, and communication skills, (3) knowledge about the negative
consequences of drug use and benefits of being drug-free, and (4) knowledge
about the prevalence of drug use in comparison to perceptions. The interactive
lessons can be delivered by trained classroom teachers or program instructors
during the school day in a 40-50 minute lesson once a week over nine weeks..
During lessons, students participate in role-play activities, cooperative
learning, games, and discussions. Students receive recognition for their
involvement and contributions to the lessons.

The program kit
costs approximately $100, depending on grade. Various other materials such
as posters, workbooks, and CDs are available and range in cost from $10 to $50.

EVALUATION OF
PROGRAM

Bacon, T. P. (2000). The effects of the Too Good for Drugs II drug prevention
program on students’ substance use intentions and risk and protective factors.
Research Bulletin, 31(3 & 4), 1-25.

Evaluated
Population: 
One thousand three hundred eighteen sixth grade students from
six schools in a Florida school district participated in this evaluation. The
sample was 52% female and was 48% white, 33% African American, 13% Hispanic, and
6% Asian. Fifty-one percent of the sample received free or reduced lunch.

Approach:
The middle schools in the district were stratified based on Florida state
criteria of academic performance, learning environment, and student
characteristics, location, and school size. Two schools were randomly assigned
to either the treatment or control groups in each of the three levels of
stratification. Intervention group schools participated in the program during
the first quarter of the school year, while the control group schools waited
until the fourth quarter of the school year to participate. Students were
assessed at post-test and at a 20-week follow-up on their intention to use
tobacco, alcohol, or marijuana and risk factors regarding susceptibility to
substance use.

Results: At
post-test, the intervention group had a significantly lower likelihood of
tobacco use intentions compared with the control group (8% vs. 12%). There was
no significant difference on tobacco use intention between groups at the 20-week
follow up. At post-test, the intervention group had a significantly lower
alcohol use intentions when compared with the control group (10% vs. 16%).
Again, though, there was no significant difference on alcohol use intention
between groups at the 20-week follow up. For intention to use marijuana, there
was no significant impact at post-test; however, at the 20-week follow-up, the
treatment group was significantly less likely to use marijuana when compared
with the control group (12% vs. 17%).

At post-test and
follow-up, treatment group students had significantly more positive scores on
resistance skills, knowledge of peer norms, peer disapproval of drug use, and
locus of control when compared with the control group. Scores on negative
attitude towards drug use and prosocial peer group were significantly higher for
the treatment group at post-test but did not remain significant at 20-week
follow-up.

SOURCES FOR
INFORMATION

Curriculum and cost
information available here:

http://www.mendezfoundation.net/too-good/Too-Good-for-Drugs-K-8.php

References:

Bacon, T. P. (2000). The effects of the Too Good for Drugs II drug prevention
program on students’ substance use intentions and risk and protective factors.
Research Bulletin, 31(3 & 4), 1-25.

Program
categorized in this guide according to the following:

Evaluated
participant ages: 11-12

Program components:
School-based

Measured outcomes:
Behavioral problems

KEYWORDS:
School-based, Children, Adolescents, Middle School, Co-ed, White, Black/African
American, Hispanic/Latino, Alcohol use, Tobacco use, Any Substance use,
Marijuana/Illicit/Prescription Drugs, Self-esteem/Self Concept.

Program information last
updated on 2/24/10.