Program

Dec 04, 2015

OVERVIEW

The HOPE Family Project is a family-group based intervention that targets youth 11-14 years old and their caregivers. This program is designed to prevent HIV and drug and alcohol abuse, by building stronger connections within the family, and educating the family on HIV, drugs, and alcohol through an eight-session intervention. The intervention proved effective in educating youth on HIV as well as helping them to be able to  communicate about difficult topics. At posttest, youth were found to be 10 times less likely to report a suicidal ideation compared to before the intervention.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: Youth (11-14 years old)

The HOPE Family Program educates youth aged 11-14 years old, and their families who live in family shelters, about HIV and drug and alcohol prevention, as well as strengthening ties in the family to build communication skills, monitoring, supervision and support. The program lasts eight sessions, with each session covering a different topic. The sessions are completed in a family-group format. Generally, in each session trained staff encourage the family and the youth to address the topic and talk freely about it, in order to discuss the associated risks, and develop strategies on how to avoid such behavior.

A manual is available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01609513.2010.510091#.UsWHWXDrzlg

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Beharie, N., Kalegerogiannis, K., McKay, M.M., Paulino, A., Miranda, A., Rivera-Rodriguez, A., Torres, E., & Ortiz, A. (2011). The HOPE family project: A family-based group intervention to reduce the impact of homelessness on HIV/STI and drug risk behaviors. Social Work with Groups, 34, 61-78. doi:10.1080/01609513.2010.510091

Evaluated Population: The HOPE Family staff performed 12 group interventions with a total of 122 youth and their caregivers. Although demographics for the youth in this study were recorded, they were not reported.

Approach: The staff reached the families of the youth by using informational recruitment sessions in the shelters and informational flyers. Data were gathered at baseline, posttest, and 6 months and 12 months after the intervention. Researchers measured 10 constructs, including youth and family demographic characteristics, shelter-related characteristics, within family support, parent-child communication, parental monitoring and supervision, violence exposure, youth substance use, youth mental health, parent mental health need, and sexual behavior. The HOPE Family intervention data were compared with data from the HOPE Health intervention. The HOPE Health intervention consists of only three sessions, and covers HIV prevention but not drugs and alcohol abuse.

Results: Youth in the HOPE Family condition showed a significant mean increase from baseline to posttest of 0.29 (p < .01), baseline to 6-month follow-up of 0.38 (p < .01), and baseline to 12-month follow-up of 0.45 (p < .1) in being able to communicate difficult topics. Youth from both conditions displayed significant increases in HIV knowledge from baseline to posttest (p < .001).Youth in the HOPE Family condition also were 10 times less likely to report no suicidal ideation at posttest when compared with baseline data.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References

Beharie, N., Kalegerogiannis, K., McKay, M.M., Paulino, A., Miranda, A., Rivera-Rodriguez, A., Torres, E., & Ortiz, A. (2011). The HOPE family project: A family-based group intervention to reduce the impact of homelessness on HIV/STI and drug risk behaviors. Social Work with Groups, 34, 61-78. doi:10.1080/01609513.2010.510091

Manual:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01609513.2010.510091#.UsWHWXDrzlg 

KEYWORDS: Adolescents (12-17), Middle School, High School, Males and Females (Co-ed), High-Risk, Clinic/Provider-based, Manual, Counseling/Therapy, Parent or Family Component, Family Therapy, Parent Training/Education, Skills Training, Abstinence Education, Depression/Mood Disorders, Health Status/Conditions

Program information last updated 12/4/15