Program

Dec 10, 2015

OVERVIEW

The College Drinker’s Check-up (CDCU) is a program designed to reduce heavy drinking and alcohol related problems in college students. CDCU is a computer-delivered intervention (CDI).  An experimental study consisting of two evaluations found that the intervention demonstrated reductions in alcohol use on between three and four drinking measures.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: College students ages 18-24

The College Drinker’s Check-up (CDCU) is a single session group-delivered program designed to reduce heavy drinking and alcohol related problems in college students. The Check-up is a computer-delivered intervention (CDI), delivered in a 35 minute session, and consists of three modules.

EVALUATION OF PROGRAM

Hester, R.K., Delaney, H.D., & Campbell, W. (2012). The college drinker’s check-up: Outcomes of two randomized clinical trials of a computer-delivered intervention. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 26(1), 1-12. 

Evaluation #1

Evaluated population: A total of 144 college students ages 18-24 years old were randomized into the treatment group (n=65) or the control group (n=79).  The average age was 20 years old and the sample included 51 percent white, 33 percent Hispanic, 8 percent Black, 7 percent Mixed race, and 1 percent Asian American.  The sample was 62 percent male and 38 percent female.

Approach: Participants were recruited from a local four-year public university and a community college using display and classified ads in the school newspapers and flyers posted on kiosks around the campuses. Participants had to meet two inclusion criteria: a) practice heavy, episodic drinking (4 + drinks per occasion for women, 5 + for men, at least once in the last two weeks and an estimated peak BAC of 80mg% or more); and b) age range of 18–24. Participants were randomized by blocks on the basis of gender, year in school, ethnicity (Hispanic, non-Hispanic White, other) and resident status (on or off-campus, Greek).

The measures used in this study were 1) heavy drinking and alcohol problems as measured by the AUDIT, a widely used 10-brief screen, 2) quantity and frequency of drinking and drug use using the Brief Drinker’s Profile (BDP), and 3) alcohol related problems using the Core Institute’s survey of drinking, drug use, and related problems. These survey questions are called the College Students Alcohol Problems (CSAP). The assessments (AUDIT, BDP, and CSAP) and program were administered at three time points: baseline, and 1 and 12 months.

The CDCU begins with a screening for heavy drinking using the AUDIT and two questions about the individual’s heaviest drinking in the last two weeks.  Those who screen positive for heavy drinking are invited to use the rest of the program. Students are then taken through three modules which include: a decisional balance exercise; feedback on the quantity and frequency of their drinking compared to their same gender fellow students; and a final module asking them how ready they are to change their drinking.

The treatment group was administered the CDCU, which includes both an assessment of and intervention for problem drinking. The control group was administered only the assessment portion of the program.

Results: Participants in both the treatment and control groups significantly reduced their drinking at both follow-ups. Compared to the control group, the CDI treatment group reduced their drinking significantly more at 1 and 12 months on three drinking measures: drinks per week, average number of drinks in two heavy episodes, and average peak blood alcohol concentration in those heavy episodes.

Evaluation #2

Evaluated population: A total of 82 college students ages 18-24 were randomized into the treatment group (n=42) or the control group (n=40).  The average age was 20 years old and the sample included 44 percent white, 40 percent Hispanic, 3 percent Black, 10 percent Mixed race, same and 3 percent Native American.  The sample was 62 percent male and 38 percent female.

Approach:  The recruitment process, inclusion criteria, and measures were the same as in Evaluation #1. Participants were randomized by blocks on the basis of gender and resident status (on or off-campus, Greek).

This evaluation compared the CDCU treatment group to a delayed assessment control condition, with assessments at baseline (CDCU group only) and at 1-month (both groups). At the 1 month follow-up, the evaluation assessed the control group for baseline drinking for the month prior to enrolling in the study (and alcohol-related problems in the previous year) and for drinking in the month between enrollment and the follow-up.

Results: Compared to the delayed assessment control group, the CDCU group significantly reduced their drinking on all consumption measures.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References

Hester, R.K., Delaney, H.D., & Campbell, W. (2012). The college drinker’s check-up: Outcomes of two randomized clinical trials of a computer-delivered intervention. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 26(1), 1-12.

Contact Information

Reid K. Hester, Ph.D.

Behavior Therapy Associates, LLP

9426 Indian School Rd NE, Ste. 1

Albuquerque, NM 87112

Email: reidhester@behaviortherapy.com

KEYWORDS: Young Adults (18-24), College, Males and Females (Co-ed), White/Caucasian, Black/African-American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian, Multiracial, Community-based, Alcohol use.

Program information last updated on 12/10/15

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