Program

Aug 29, 2011

OVERVIEW

Supporting
Adolescents with Guidance and Employment (SAGE) is a community based violence
prevention program targeted toward African American males. The program combines
three components, an Afrocentric “Rite of Passage” instructional program, a
summer job training and placement program, and an after-school entrepreneurial
training program, to foster positive development and reduce violent behavior
among African American male adolescents. The SAGE program was found to have
positive impacts on carrying a gun and selling illegal drugs at the 18-month
follow-up. There were no significant impacts on carrying a knife, fighting,
receiving treatment for intentional injury, using a gun or knife to hurt
someone, using drugs, consuming 5 or more alcoholic drinks, having sexual
intercourse, or damaging property at the 18-month follow-up. In addition, there
were no significant impacts of the SAGE program across these measures at the
30-month follow-up.

DESCRIPTION
OF PROGRAM

Target
population: 
African American male adolescents.

The SAGE program is
comprised of three components: an Afro-centric “Rite of Passage” program (ROP),
a summer jobs training and placement program (JTP), and an after school
entrepreneurial program that uses the Junior Achievement model (JA).

The Rite of Passage
(ROP) program consists of biweekly seminars held over an 8-month period covering
topics such as conflict resolution, African American history, male sexuality,
and manhood training. On alternate weeks, participants spend time with an adult
African American male mentor. In addition, academic tutoring is provided to
youth with academic difficulty, and outreach is provided to the families of
disruptive or disengaged youth. The Rite of Passage program culminates in an
overnight camping trip, including a private rite of initiation into manhood, and
a graduation ceremony. The job training and placement program (JTP) takes place
over the summer, beginning with an orientation and training session about
behavior and dress in the workplace. After the training, youth are matched with
worksites and placed in a 6-week summer job paying minimum wage. The
after-school entrepreneurial program (JA) takes place over a three- month
period. Under the guidance of an adult volunteer from the local business
community, the youth form a legal corporation, develop a business plan, elect
officers, and sell stock to family and friends. The youth then market and sell
a product and are paid a salary.

EVALUATION(S)
OF PROGRAM

Flewelling , R.,Paschall,
M.J.,
Lissy,
K.,
Burrus,
B.,
Ringwalt,
C.,
Graham,
P., & et al. (1999).
A
process and outcome evaluation of “Supporting Adolescents with Guidance and
Employment (SAGE)”: A community-based violence prevention program for African
American male adolescents. Research Triangle
Park, NC: Research Triangle Institute. Final Report to: Division of Violence
Prevention, National Center for Injury Control and Prevention, Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention, Grant No. U81/CCU408504-01.

Evaluated
population: 
The study was conducted with African American males 12 to 16
years old living in Durham County, North Carolina. Youth were identified and
recruited through radio announcements, referrals from school guidance and
juvenile court counselors, and direct contact in public housing developments. A
total of 263 youth were enrolled over a two-year period; of these, 255 were
eligible. The mean age of the sample was 14. 53 percent of the sample was
eligible for free or reduced lunch. 50 percent of the sample was not in
residence with a father or father-figure.

Approach: Of
the youth eligible for the program (N=255), 86 were randomly assigned to the
condition with all three components (ROP, JTP, JA); 84 were randomly assigned to
the condition with the summer job training component and the after-school
entrepreneurial component (JTP, JA); and 85 were randomly assigned to the
control group, receiving the delayed entrepreneurial component (delayed JA). In
baseline and in two follow-up surveys, youth were asked about their most recent
participation in a variety of risk behaviors, including physical
violence-related measures (i.e., physical fighting, carrying a gun or knife);
using or selling of illicit drugs; engaging in sexual activity; and vandalism.
In addition to the survey, data were collected from school suspension records,
hospital records, and juvenile court records. The survey was conducted at the
baseline, as well as at 18-month and 30-month follow up interviews.

Results: The
three-component SAGE intervention (ROP, JTP, JA) was found to have
positive impacts on carrying a gun and selling illegal drugs at the 18-month
follow-up. There were no significant impacts of the three-component
intervention on carrying a knife, fighting, receiving treatment for intentional
injury, using a gun or knife to hurt someone, using drugs, having 5 or more
drinks, having sexual intercourse, or damaging property at the 18-month
follow-up. There were no significant impacts of the three component
intervention at the 30-month follow-up. The two component intervention (JTP,
JA) demonstrated no significant impacts at either the 18- or 30-month
follow-ups. The authors note that the pattern of inputs was encouraging at 18
months, but the positive trends dissipated by 30 months.

SOURCES FOR
MORE INFORMATION

References:

Flewelling , R.,Paschall,
M.J.,Lissy,
K.,Burrus,
B.,Ringwalt,
C.,Graham,
P., & et al. (1999).A
process and outcome evaluation of “Supporting Adolescents with Guidance and
Employment (SAGE)”: A community-based violence prevention program for African
American male adolescents. Research Triangle
Park, NC: Research Triangle Institute. Final Report to: Division of Violence
Prevention, National Center for Injury Control and Prevention, Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention, Grant No. U81/CCU408504-01.

KEYWORDS:
Adolescents (12-17); Male Only; Black/African American; High Risk;
Community-Based; Skills Training; Vocational Learning; Other Behavioral
Problems; Delinquency; Aggression; Mentoring; After-School Program; Summer
Program; Tutoring; Other Substance Use; Sexual Activity; Alcohol Use.

Program
information last updated 08/29/2011.

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