Program

Oct 05, 2010

OVERVIEW

Support,
Empowerment, and Education (SEE), a modified version of Multiple Family
Group Psychoeducation, (MFGP)is a community-based group program for
primary caregivers of children with severe emotional disturbances. MFGP
promotes parental social support, parental sense of empowerment, parental
knowledge of child mental illness, and parental advocacy skills with the
eventual goal of improving children’s emotional and behavioral problems.
In an evaluation of the intervention, parents of children with severe
emotional disturbances were randomly assigned to either receive the
typical intensive case management (ICM) treatment or to receive SEE.
Results indicated that children in the ICM and ICM plus SEE did not differ
significantly in the amount of change in behavioral problems between
entrance into the study and 18 months after initial assessments. However,
parents in the ICM plus SEE group did report an increased use of social
networks for support.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target
population: 
Children and adolescents diagnosed with severe emotional
disturbances.

Using a
family psychoeducational model, SEE is a group intervention for primary
caregivers of children with severe emotional disturbances. The program
promotes parental social support, sense of empowerment, knowledge of child
mental illness, and advocacy skills with the eventual goal of improving
their children’s emotional and behavioral problems.

Similar to
MFGP uses a highly structured problem solving approach to meeting the
program’s goals. Parents meet in group sessions, and each session has a
group leader. SEE uses an additional approach which group leaders
encourage parents to ask questions, request clarification, and seek
additional information if necessary. Groups meet twice a month for
two-hour sessions, and parents participate in group sessions for a minimum
of six months. Parents meet separately from children, and childcare is
provided on site. Group leaders are trained in an all day session.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Ruffolo,
M. C., Kuhn, M. T., & Evans, M. E. (2005). Support, empowerment, and
education: A study of multiple family group education. Journal of
Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 13,
200-212.

Evaluated
population:
A total of 94 primary caregivers of children with severe emotional
disturbances and who were enrolled in intensive case management programs
in both urban and rural areas served as the sample for this evaluation.
Children enrolled in the intensive case management (ICM) programs have
histories of multiple out-of-home placements or inpatient
hospitalizations. Symptoms displayed by children in the sample included
suicidal ideation, depression, anxiety, acting dangerously towards others,
verbal and physical aggression, and temper outbursts.

Seventy-nine
percent of the primary caregivers were white, and 15% were black.
Ninety-five percent of the primary caregivers were female, 70% were
single. Roughly half of the caregivers reported substance abuse problems
in the family, 40% had previously received treatment for mental illness,
and 45% were living in impoverished conditions.

Approach: Caregivers and children were randomly assigned to receive either
typical ICM care or to the Support, Empowerment, and Education (SEE) plus
typical ICM care group.

Parents
completed structured assessment interviews at baseline and at 9 and 18
months after entrance into the study. Assessments included measures of
parent social support network use, parent problem solving and coping
skills, and child behavioral symptoms.

Results: Results indicated few differences between the ICM-only and the ICM
plus SEE intervention groups. There were no significant differences
between groups on the measures of parental problem solving and coping
skills. Furthermore, there were no differences across groups on changes
in child behavioral symptoms; this indicates that the SEE intervention did
not provide any added benefits for the children. In regards to indicators
of parental social support network use, parents in the ICM-only
intervention were significantly more likely to report an increase in
needing people to help them do things over the course of the study than
parents in the ICM plus SEE group. Additionally, parents in the ICM plus
SEE group were significantly more likely over time to ask others for
advice.

SOURCES FOR MORE
INFORMATION

References:

Ruffolo, M.
C., Kuhn, M. T., & Evans, M. E. (2005). Support, empowerment, and
education: A study of multiple family group education. Journal of
Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 13,
200-212.

KEYWORDS:
Mental Health; Parent Training; Aggression/Violence/Bullying; Urban; Rural
and/or Frontier; Co-ed; Tutoring; Parent or Family Component; Community-Based.

Program
information last updated on 10/5/10.