Program

Aug 08, 2011

OVERVIEW

Success in Stages: Build Respect, Stop Bullying is a brief interactive computer program designed to prevent and stop bullying in schools. Students complete three sessions of the program and receive individualized feedback about their bullying behaviors. An experimental evaluation of the program found that, about one month after the intervention, middle and high schools that received the intervention had significantly fewer students participating in bullying behaviors and a higher proportion of students who no longer reported being a bully, a victim, or a bystander than schools that did not receive the intervention.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: Middle and high school students

Success in Stages: Build Respect, Stop Bullying is an interactive computer program designed to stop and prevent bullying in schools. Students complete three half-hour sessions of the program, which includes text, pictures, and short movies. The program assesses students’ current bullying behaviors and roles and provides individualized feedback to help students change their bullying participation. The program provides normative feedback, comparing the individual’s bullying habits to peers who are more successful in altering their habits, and individual feedback, describing how the individual has progressed since his or her last session.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Evers, K. E., Prochaska, J. O., Van Marter, D. F., Johnson, J. L., & Prochaska, J. M.  (2007). Transtheortical-based bullying prevention effectiveness trials in middle schools and high schools. Educational Research, 49(4), 397-414.

Evaluated population: Students from 12 middles schools and 13 high schools participated in the evaluation. There were 2839 students in the middle school intent-to-treat sample and 2713 students in the high-school intent-to-treat sample.

Approach: Schools were matched on three variables (type of community, region of country, and percentage of students eligible for free lunches) and randomly assigned to a control group or one of two intervention groups. The two intervention groups were equivalent, except that one group did not receive a pretest. This design was used to control for any pretest effects.

All consenting students in the intervention group schools completed the Build Respect, Stop Bullying program. On average, students completed the three sessions over a two-month period. Teachers in the intervention schools received a staff guide and had access to a website that allowed them to download worksheets for classroom use, if they chose too.

Students were assessed on three bullying roles (bully, victim, and passive bystander) and on their intentions to change their roles. The assessments were completed on the computer at pretest (for two of the groups) and posttest (for all three groups).

Results: This study experienced high attrition; though a precise estimate is not provided, it appears that half of the students could not or did not provide follow-up data. The last data point available was used in the intent-to-treat analyses.

Intervention schools had significantly fewer students participating in bullying behaviors and a higher proportion of students who no longer reported being a bully, a victim, or a bystander at posttest than control schools. These impacts were found for both middle and high schools.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References:

Evers, K. E., Prochaska, J. O., Van Marter, D. F., Johnson, J. L., & Prochaska, J. M.  (2007). Transtheortical-based bullying prevention effectiveness trials in middle schools and high schools. Educational Research, 49(4), 397-414.

KEYWORDS: Adolescents (12-16), Youth (16+), Middle School, High School, Males and Females (co-ed), White/Caucasian, Hispanic/Latino, Black/African American, Asian, School-based, Computer-based, Aggression/Bullying

Program information last updated 8/8/2011.