Program

Structure, Themes, Open Communication, Reflection, Individuality, Experiential Learning, and Social Problem Solving (STORIES)

Jul 06, 2010

OVERVIEW

STORIES (Structure, Themes, Open Communication, Reflection, Individuality, Experiential Learning, and Social Problem Solving) is an anti-aggression, hostility, and bullying program for elementary school students that teaches social skills through stories.  An evaluation of the program found that students participating in the STORIES program who were lower in aggression at baseline had significant reductions in externalizing behavior and normative beliefs about aggression, while students higher in aggression at baseline had worse outcomes.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: Elementary school students

The STORIES program aims to teach children social skills through a story-based structure revolving around bullying.  The stories provide a beginning, middle, and end for children to follow, allow for themes and subtopics to be introduced, and provide rules for group interactions.  The stories chosen all have a bully, victim, and bystander, who partake in interactions and reinforce prosocial group norms. The group sessions provide a setting where students are secure in their communication of sensitive issues. The program is designed to be delivered in groups of four to six children including one or two children identified as exhibiting aggressive behavior.  The program takes place in small groups of four to six children, of whom one to two were identified as aggressive, over 15 sessions, which meet once a week for an hour.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Teglasi, H. and L. Rothman (2001). A classroom-based program to reduce aggressive behavior. Journal of School Psychology 39(1): 71-94.

Evaluated population:  This evaluation had a sample of 59 students from two fourth- and fifth-grade classes in two elementary schools.  The majority of students were African American. Seventeen of the students in the sample were identified as aggressive through teacher nomination.

Approach: Participants were randomly assigned to participate in the STORIES program or a wait-list control group.  Students in the wait-list control group participated in the STORIES program in the second half of the school year.  Students were assessed at post-test on externalizing behavior and beliefs about aggression.

Results: Based on teacher ratings, students in the STORIES group had significantly reduced normative beliefs about the acceptability of aggression and externalizing behavior when compared with the control group.  Among students identified as aggressive at pre-test, however, those in the STORIES group had significantly higher normative beliefs about the acceptability of aggression and externalizing behavior when compared with the control group.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References:

Teglasi, H. and L. Rothman (2001). A classroom-based program to reduce aggressive behavior. Journal of School Psychology 39(1): 71-94.

Program categorized in this guide according to the following:

Evaluated participant ages: 9-10

Program components: school-based

Measured outcomes:

KEYWORDS: Elementary, Children, Males and Females (co-ed), Black/African American, School-based, Aggression/Violence/Bullying

Program information last updated 7/6/10