Program

Aug 04, 2008

OVERVIEW

The SEARCH/TEACH
Tutoring approach has a dual approach which tries to identify students who are
at risk of failure as soon as possible and then provides intensive tutoring in
skills related to reading, writing, and spelling. A randomized evaluation
of SEARCH/TEACH Tutoring found that did not have any impact on any of the
measured outcomes: word comprehension, phonetic analysis, reading/decoding,
written spelling, and reading achievement.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: Elementary school-aged children

SEARCH/TEACH Tutoring is an intervention for children
entering elementary school who are at-risk for later academic failure.
The SEARCH component of the program is a screening battery which identifies
children at-risk for reading failure. During the
TEACH Tutoring sessions, children meet one-on-one with a tutor for half-hour
sessions for 25 weeks. At these sessions, children work with the tutor on
visual, motor, auditory, body image, and intermodal tasks. The program
has been used in 85 different schools and with children of many different
backgrounds.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Mantzicopoulos, P., Morrison, D., Stone, E., & Setrakian,
W. (1992).
Use of SEARCH/TEACH tutoring approach with
middle-class students at risk for reading failure. The Elementary
School Journal, 92
(5), 573-586.

Evaluated population: 225 children ages
5-7 from four school districts in California.
The children were from upper-middle, middle, and lower-middle class
households. Three-quarters of the students were white, 8 percent were
black, 6 percent were Asian, and 5 percent were Hispanic.

Approach: At the outset of the study, each
kindergarten student was evaluated for 3 consecutive years using the SEARCH
instrument for identifying delayed acquisition of spatial and temporal
orientation. Children who scored below the 33rd percentile on
five SEARCH subtests were classified as “at-risk” and those who did not meet
this criterion were classified as “not-at-risk”. Researchers selected an
equivalent number of at-risk and not-at-risk students from each
classroom. At-risk students were matched on SEARCH scores and randomly
assigned to one of three groups: the TEACH intervention, a phonetic
intervention, or a control group. Children in both TEACH and the phonetic
intervention groups attended half hour, one-on-one tutoring sessions with
credentialed tutors twice a week for 25 weeks. During TEACH sessions,
students worked on visual, motor, auditory, body image, and intermodal tasks.
During phonetic sessions, students worked for 30 minutes on reading and
spelling drills. Children in the control group attended their regular
classes but did not receive any additional instruction.

Results: 57 students dropped out of the study
resulting in 75 percent completion. When researchers analyzed for
non-random attrition, they found no differences between any groups. At
the first and second grade follow-up periods, children in the phonetic group
intervention had higher scores on a word attack test than children in the
control group. The TEACH intervention had no impact on word attack.
The TEACH intervention did not have any impact on word comprehension, phonetic
analysis, reading/decoding, written spelling, and reading achievement.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References

Mantzicopoulos, P., Morrison, D., Stone, E., & Setrakian,
W. (1992). Use of SEARCH/ TEACH tutoring approach with
middle-class students at risk for reading failure. The Elementary
School Journal, 92
(5), 573-586.

KEYWORDS: Middle Childhood (6-11), Children (3-11),
High-Risk, Elementary School, White or Caucasian, Black or African American,
Asian, Hispanic or Latino, School-based, Tutoring, Mentoring, Education,
Academic Achievement

Program information last updated 8/4/08