Program

Mar 14, 2007

OVERVIEW

RELATE for Teens is a computer-based program designed to
help improve behavioral skills, prevent usage of drugs and alcohol, improve
academic achievement, and reduce aggressive and violent behavior. The
program includes video stories, cognitive and behavioral training, media
analysis, and review/assessment exercises. The study described below found
that the RELATE for Teens program was effective in increasing positive social
behaviors and reducing negative social behaviors.

DESCRIPTION OF
PROGRAM

Target population: Middle
school students

RELATE
for Teens programs are exclusively computer-based activities which cover more
than 350 issues relating to adolescent development. Students can choose
from a large variety of tools, including short video clips, assessment
exercises, etc., to examine any issue more in-depth. The schedule of the
program is flexible and allows for students to examine issues either on a
specified schedule or at their own pace. Instructors can track students’
progress through additional computer programs or request that students complete
and print out individual modules.

EVALUATION(S) OF
PROGRAM

Stern,
R. & Repa, J. T. (2000). A study of the efficacy of computerized
skill building for adolescents: Reducing aggression and increasing pro-social
behavior
(Report No. IR020414). New York, NY: New York City Board of
Education. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED447792)

Evaluated
population: 
57 7th and 8th grade students from
public middle schools in New York City. The sample was racially and
ethnically diverse, with a nearly equal representation of African-American,
Hispanic, Asian, and Caucasian students. Each treatment group consisted
of students with a wide range of academic abilities.

Approach: Students were individually and randomly assigned to one of three
conditions: computer-based training (n=17), teacher-directed computer-based
training (n=17), and a control group (n=23). Students in the
computer-based training without teacher direction were given a set lesson plan
of 24 topics to explore over a span of 12 weeks. Students in the
teacher-directed computer-based teaching condition received the same lesson
plan as the other treatment condition. Additionally, students in this
condition participated in role play activities and discussions led by a teacher
and guidance counselor. Students in both treatment conditions participated
in the program several times every week during classroom free time. Data
were collected through observations, school records, and tracking forms.

Results: Researcher observations found that students in both treatment conditions
performed more positive social behaviors, and fewer negative behaviors when
compared with the control group. Intervention groups also had fewer
negative social behaviors on the subscales measuring “conflict resolution”
and “kindness”. Furthermore, both treatment groups had more
instances of positive social behaviors on the subscales measuring respect and
sharing. Academic performance was found to increase in both treatment
groups, but not at a significant level. Computer-based training without
teacher direction treatment groups were found to have more pro-social behaviors
on the respect scale compared with the other two groups, control and
computer-based training with teacher direction.

SOURCES FOR MORE
INFORMATION

Link to program curriculum: <a
href=”http://www.rippleeffects.com/education/software/teens.html”>http://www.rippleeffects.com/education/software/teens.html

References

Stern,
R. & Repa, J. T. (2000). A study of the efficacy of computerized
skill building for adolescents: Reducing aggression and increasing pro-social
behavior
(Report No. IR020414). New York, NY: New York City Board of
Education. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED447792)

KEYWORDS: Adolescents, Middle School, Co-ed, School-Based, Computer-Based, Agressions, Academic Achievement/Grades, Other Social/Emotional Health, Manual is Available

Program
information last updated 3/14/07