Program

Jul 24, 2007

OVERVIEW

The Ready to Learn program targets children’s listening
skills, attending skills, and social skills. In a study of this program’s
effectiveness, pre-school classes were randomly assigned to receive the Ready
to Learn program or not to receive any program. Compared with students
who did not receive the Ready to Learn program,
students who received the program showed greater improvement over time on
understanding of story structure, teacher ratings of behavior, and observer
ratings of attending behavior. Treatment students did not show
significantly greater improvement than control students on a measure of
listening comprehension.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: pre-school students

The Ready to Learn program focuses on three target skill
areas: listening comprehension, attending skills, and social skills.
These skills are taught using five strategies: modeling-coaching-cuing,
positive peer reporting, student story telling, student story retelling, and
encouragement council. Pre-school teachers systematically embed these
strategies into daily classroom routines.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Brigman, G., Lane, D., Lane, D., Lawrence, R., & Switzer, D.(2001).Teaching
Children School
Success Skills.The Journal of Educational Research, 92(6),
323-329.

Evaluated population: 145 four- and five-year old
children constituted the study sample for this investigation. These
children were drawn from 10 classrooms at three inner-city preschool
centers. Approximately 95% of the sample was black, and the remaining 5%
was white.

Approach: Each of the ten classrooms participating in
this study was randomly assigned to the treatment group or to the control
group. At the commencement of the school year, teachers and assistants
from the five treatment classrooms took part in two seven-hour Ready to Learn training workshops. They then implemented Ready to Learn strategies in their classrooms all year,
devoting approximately two hours each week to program activities. As the
year progressed, teachers and aides also attended three half-day workshops to
review skills and discuss progress. Treatment classrooms were observed
weekly, and teachers received feedback on their implementation of the program
strategies.

All students were evaluated in several areas at the beginning
of the school year, halfway through the school year, and near the end of the
school year. Students completed assessments of listening comprehension
and understanding of story structure. Teachers rated students on a
measure of attention, on-task behavior, social skills, hyperactivity, and
oppositional behavior. Outside observers rated students on their
attending behavior.

Results: Compared with students from control
classrooms, students from treatment classrooms showed greater improvement over
time on understanding of story structure, teacher ratings of behavior, and
observer ratings of attending behavior. Treatment students did not show
significantly greater improvement than control students on the measure of
listening comprehension.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References:

Brigman, G., Lane, D., Lane, D., Lawrence, R., & Switzer, D.
(2001).Teaching
Children School
Success Skills.The Journal of Educational Research, 92(6),
323-329.

Curriculum materials are unavailable for purchase.

KEYWORDS:
Early Childhood (0-5), Children, Preschool, Education, Cognitive Development,
Social and Emotional Health, Behavioral Problems, School-Based, Behavioral
Problems, Urban, Black or African American, White or Caucasian.

Program information last updated 7/24/07

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