Program

Sep 24, 2009

OVERVIEW

Project WIN
(Working out Integrated Negotiations) is a curriculum designed to increase
cooperation between classmates and decrease conflict. In this study, students
were randomly assigned to receive the Project WIN curriculum or continue their
normal school schedule. Students in the Project WIN group showed significant
increases in cooperative attitudes toward classmates and in cooperative
attitudes toward conflict when compared with the control group.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population:
Fifth grade students.

Project WIN takes
place in the classroom over 17, 45-60 minute sessions. A typical session
involves a review of the previous day’s material, a preview of the upcoming
material, a brainstorming session about important terms for the current day’s
material, and participatory exercises, such as role-play, to reinforce the
lesson.

Sessions focus:
transforming a competitive social context to a cooperative social context and
teaching integrative negotiation strategies. Examples of activities designed to
help students develop cooperative attitudes toward classmates include ice
breakers at the beginning of a session about new or good things in their life,
brainstorming sessions about classroom rules to increase trust, and a series of
cooperative games where students work together to reach a common goal. Examples
of activities designed to help students develop cooperative attitudes toward
conflict include brainstorming sessions about ways to calm down when upset,
lessons about alternatives to violence, and strategies to create win-win
situations.

Training for
Project WIN costs $1,000 per trainee for a total of 17 sessions. Trainees
receive a manual and certificate of completion.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Roberts, L.,
White, G., & Yeomans, P. (2004). Theory development and evaluation of Project
WIN: A violence reduction program for early adolescents. Journal of Early
Adolescence, 24
(4), 460-483.

Evaluated
population:
Thirty four fifth grade students in a kindergarten through 8th
grade school in a low-income, urban area in Pennsylvania participated in this
study. The median family income in the area is approximately $26,000. In the
study, 75% of the students were African American, 19% were Caucasian, and 6%
were Hispanic. Sixty three percent of the students in the study were female.

Approach:
Students were randomly assigned to the treatment group (n = 19) or control group
(n = 15) at the beginning of the school year.

Students were
assessed at post-test on their cooperative attitudes toward classmates and on
cooperative attitudes toward conflict. Students were scored on these attitudes
using 19 items with Likert-type responses. Items for cooperative attitudes
toward classmates included “I would like to be friends with the kids in this
class,” “If I tell a secret in this class, it will stay secret,” and “When I
need help, I can count on the kids in this class.” Items for cooperative
attitudes toward conflict included “When I have a conflict with someone, I want
to win and I want the other person to lose” and “People who stay calm during a
conflict can stay out of a fight.”

Results:
Students in the treatment group had a significant increase in cooperative
attitudes towards classmates (a large effect size of 0.9) when compared with the
control group, including the Liking (a large effect size of 1.12) and Teamwork
(a large effect size of 0.74) subscales. There was no significant difference
between groups on the Trust subscale. Students in the treatment group also had
a significant increase in cooperative attitudes toward conflict (effect size =
0.79) when compared with the control group.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References

Roberts, L., White,
G., & Yeomans, P. (2004). Theory development and evaluation of Project WIN: A
violence reduction program for early adolescents. Journal of Early
Adolescence, 24
(4), 460-483.

Contact Information:

Laura Roberts
Ph.D., M.Ed,

Roberts Educational Research
44 Douglas Road
Landsdale, PA 19446

Phone: 215-822-8623

Email:

LRinchworm@comcast.net

Website:
http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/safeschools/registry.html
(scroll down to
Project WIN)

KEYWORDS: Cost,
Children, Elementary, Co-ed, Black/African American, White, School-based, Skills Training, Urban,
Social Skills, Life Skills

Program
information last updated 9/24/09

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