Program

Dec 04, 2015

OVERVIEW

 Project ÒRÉ is an HIV- and STI-prevention program that is delivered to a group of friends. It is designed for adolescent African American girls, and is delivered in a single five-hour workshop. An experimental study of the program found that, three months later, there was increased HIV testing among 14- and 15-year-olds, decreased number of 16- and 17-year-olds who had multiple sexual partners, and decreased number of 18- to 21-year-olds who had sex without a condom among program participants.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

 Target population: African American adolescent girls

Project ÒRÉ is a one-session HIV and STI prevention program that is delivered to a group of friends. In it, an African American female educator covers seven learning modules over the course of five hours. It includes a variety of teaching methods, including didactic teaching, interactive group discussion and exercises, self-risk appraisal, and video clips to stimulate discussion. The theme of connectedness to friends and community is woven throughout the session.

The first module is an Afri-centric rite of passage, to build cohesion among the group and commit them to the intervention. The second and third modules focus on knowledge about HIV/STIs and sexual risk behaviors. The fourth module includes a formal commitment to remain sexually healthy, including a signed contract. The fifth module is about condom-use knowledge and skills, and the sixth module is on sexual communication skills. The seventh module is a reaffirmation of the commitment to stay healthy, and a review discussion.

EVALUATION OF PROGRAM

 Dolcini, M. M., Harper, G. W., Boyer, C. B., & Pollack, L. M. (2010). Project ÒRÉ: A friendship-based intervention to prevent HIV/STI in urban African American adolescent females. Health Education Behavior, 37(1), 115-132.

 Evaluated population: African American adolescent girls (ages 14-18) from four neighborhoods in San Francisco were recruited to participate in the study. To be eligible, they had to be sexually experienced. A total of 70 girls participated. Each one nominated a group of female friends to take the intervention with them. Friends had to be between ages 14 and 21, but there were no other restrictions, including residence or sexual experience. There were 194 “friends” who participated in the study.

Overall, 32 percent of the total sample were between ages 14 and 15, 33 percent between age 16 and 17, and 35 percent between ages 18 and 21. Most were African American alone (92 percent), but there were some participants who were Hispanic, Asian, or of mixed race. At the time of intervention, 71 percent were sexually experienced and 12 percent had a child.

Approach: Two neighborhoods were randomly selected to receive the intervention and two to receive a control intervention. Girls from two of the neighborhoods received the Project ÒRÉ intervention along with their friends (from that neighborhood or others), while girls from the other two neighborhoods received the control intervention, which was focused on diet and exercise. The control intervention lasted the same amount of time and used similar teaching methods. Both conditions included the same African rite of passage.

Outcomes were measured at baseline and three months after the girls took the workshop. The outcomes measured were HIV and STI testing, number of sexual partners in the past year, and condom use. The analysis adjusted for clustering at the neighborhood level.

Results: Overall, there were no significant impacts on any outcome. However, there were significant impacts by age. Among 18- to 21-year-olds, the intervention reduced the incidence of sex without a condom. Among 16- and 17-year-olds, the intervention reduced the incidence of multiple partners. Among 14- and 15-year-olds, the intervention increased HIV testing, but not STI testing.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

 References

 Dolcini, M. M., Harper, G. W., Boyer, C. B., & Pollack, L. M. (2010). Project ÒRÉ: A friendship-based intervention to prevent HIV/STI in urban African American adolescent females. Health Education Behavior, 37(1), 115-132.

Contact Information

 Dr. M. Margaret Dolcini

Hallie E. Ford Center

2631 SW Campus Way, Room 249

Corvallis, OR 97331-8687

541-737-3829

peggy.dolcini@oregonstate.edu

KEYWORDS: Adolescents, Youth, Female Only, Black/African American, Urban, Community-Based, Skills Training, Sexual Activity, Condom Use and Contraception, Other Reproductive Health.

Program information last updated on 12/4/15

Subscribe to Child Trends

Short weekly updates of recent research on children and youth.