Program

Oct 09, 2010

OVERVIEW

Children referred to a psychiatric facility
for severe antisocial behavior participated in a two-tiered intervention
designed to reduce antisocial behavior and improve the child and family
functioning. The two-tiered intervention is a combination of was comprised of
problem-solving skills training (PSST), which focuses on the child’s
cognitive-behavioral repertoire, and parent management training (PMT), which
focuses on child rearing practices, parent-child interactions, and parental
practices that support prosocial behaviors in and outside of the home. PSST +
PMT was more likely to evidence marked changes in child and parent functioning,
and placed greater proportion of youth within the range of non-clinic levels of
functioning than families assigned to only the PSST or PMT conditions.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population:
School-age children who display antisocial
behaviors

The intervention was designed to reduce antisocial behaviors and improve child
and family functioning through problem-solving skills training (PSST) and parent
management training (PMT) or a combination of both. PSST focuses on child’s
cognitive-behavioral repertoire and PMT focuses on child rearing practices.
Children attended 25 weekly therapy sessions that included role-playing,
modeling, practice, corrective feedback and reinforcement to develop
problem-solving skills.The parents
attended 16 individual sessions that addressed observing and defining behavior,
variations of positive reinforcement, shaping, negotiating and contracting, and
providing time out, reprimands, and special contingencies for low-rate behavior.
Children were brought into the sessions at different points to help parents
review the program and negotiate reinforcement, as well as to monitor the
parents’ execution and adherence to the program, and to supervise and shape
parent-child negotiations of home- and school-based reinforcement contingencies.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Kazdin, A. E.,
Siegel, T. C., & Bass, D. (1992). Cognitive problem-solving skills training and
parent management training in the treatment of antisocial behavior in children.
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 60(5), 733-747.

Evaluated population:
Ninety-sevenchildren (aged 7-13 years) who were referred to a psychiatric facility for
aggressive and antisocial behavior participated in the study. The participants
included 21 girls and 76 boys, of which 69% were white, and 31% were black.
Sixty-one percent of children came from two-parent families, with the remaining
39% coming from single-parent families.

Approach:
The study employed a randomized experimental
trial, where families were randomly
assigned to one of three conditions (PSST, PMT, or PSST + PMT), each lasting
approximately 6-8 months.

Participants were selected based on the following criteria: receipt of treatment
referral for violence or truancy; parents reported aggression or delinquency;
read at or above second grade level; showed no evidence of neurological
impairment; were not receiving psychotropic mediation; and were 7 to 13 years of
age. If children and families met the criteria, they were randomly assigned to
one of treatment conditions

To
measure the effectiveness of the intervention to reduce antisocial behavior and
improve child and family functioning, pre- and post-treatment assessments of
child dysfunction and prosocial competence; performance at school; adaptive and
competence-related behaviors; aggressive, antisocial, and delinquent behaviors;
and parent and family functioning were administered.

Results:
Analyses revealed that PSST + PMT led to significant improvements in overall
child dysfunction, prosocial competence, and aggressive, antisocial, and
delinquent behaviors. The intervention also significantly improved child
aggression, antisocial behavior, and delinquency, and parental stress,
depression, and other symptoms of parent dysfunction, relative to PSST or PMT
only. PSST + PMT combined also placed greater proportion of youth within
normative levels of functioning. At post-treatment and at follow-up,
significantly more PSST + PMT cases fell within normal range, greater than PSST
or PMT cases.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References

Kazdin, A. E.,
Siegel, T. C., & Bass, D. (1997). Cognitive problem-solving skills training and
parent management training in the treatment of antisocial behavior in children.
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 60(5), 733-747.

KEYWORDS:
Problem-Solving Skills, Delinquent Behavior, Childhood (6 to 12), Adolescence
(12 to 17); White or Caucasian, Parent or Family Component, Life Skills,
Aggression, Behavior Problems.

Program
information last updated 10/9/2010