Program

Feb 22, 2012

OVERVIEW

The planned behavior-based intervention aims
to change attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control regarding
safe sex behavior, particularly condom carrying. The intervention is based on
the idea that people’s behaviors are determined by intentions, which are
determined by attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control. In
an experimental evaluation, the intervention significantly increased message
processing (amount of information read and recalled), message acceptance
(interest, persuasion, and helpfulness of message), subjective norm and
intention for condom carrying among participants.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

The intervention consists of three sections of literature for participants to
read. The sections are designed to change attitude, perceived behavioral
control, and subjective norm in reference to carrying condoms. It is based on
the theory of planned behavior, which proposes that people’s behavior is
determined by intention. Intention is defined as a measure of motivation to
engage in particular behaviors. According to the theory, people engage in
behaviors that they believe are positive (attitude), where they perceive social
pressure (subjective norm), and believe the behavior is achievable (perceived
behavioral control). As part of the intervention, participants answer questions
about their reaction to the messages in the three sections during
semi-structured interviews. The focus of the intervention is on the advantages
and disadvantages of carrying condoms (attitude), the factors that might
facilitate or inhibit carrying condoms (perceived behavioral control), and the
people who would want/not want them to carry a condom with them (subjective
norm).

Target population: Male and female youth

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Armitage, C.J.,
& Talibudeen, L. (2010). Test of a brief theory of planned behavior-based
intervention to promote adolescent safe sex intentions. British Journal of
Psychology, 101, 155-172.

Evaluated
population: 
In total, 288 participants were evaluated. The participants
were 215 women and 65 men (8 did not report gender) between the ages of 16 and
18 (M=16.79) from a college in the south of England. They had a range of
socio-economic backgrounds.

Approach:
Participants were randomized into a theory-based intervention condition or a
knowledge control condition. Pre- and post-test theory of planned behavior
measures were administered immediately prior to and immediately following the
intervention. Measured outcomes included attitude, perceived behavioral
control, subjective norm, message processing, message acceptance, and intention
for condom carrying. Questionnaires were distributed in study periods and
completed in the classroom. The intervention group completed semi-structured
interviews. The focus of the interviews was on the advantages and disadvantages
of carrying condoms (attitude), the factors that might facilitate or inhibit
carrying condoms (perceived behavioral control), and the people who would
want/not want them to carry a condom with them (subjective norm). Those in the
control group had the same three section interview format that focused on the
history of the condom. There were no significant differences between conditions
at baseline.

Results:
Message processing, message acceptance, subjective norm and intention increased
significantly between pre- and post-test for the experimental group. At
post-test, there was a significant difference between control and intervention
groups for subjective norm. Both experimental and control groups demonstrated a
significant increase in intention, with a larger effect size in the experimental
group. Intentions of participants in the intervention group to carry condoms
were significantly higher than those in the control group at post-test. There
were no significant differences between at pre-and post-tests for attitude and
perceived behavioral control.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References
Armitage, C.J., &
Talibudeen, L. (2010). Test of a brief theory of planned behavior-based
intervention to promote adolescent safe sex intentions. British Journal of
Psychology, 101
, 155-172.

KEYWORDS:
Adolescents (12-17), Youth (16+), Young Adults (18-24), College, Sexual
Activity, Condom Use and Contraception

Program
information last updated 2/22/12.