Program

Jan 14, 2014

OVERVIEW

The Parents and Teens for Health program is a group intervention for adolescents which teaches affect management to improve the participant’s skills in emotion regulation in risky situations, and their motivation and skills with regard to HIV prevention. In an experimental evaluation, no significant differences were found between the intervention and control groups.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: Adolescents and youth (12-18 years old)

Parents and Teens for Health (PATH) is a group-based program designed to teach adolescents and youth affect management skills. The program focuses on helping the youth regulate their emotions in risky situations. Improving motivation to engage in HIV testing behaviors and HIV prevention skills are also emphasized throughout the program. The program typically lasts for five weeks, with one two-hour session per week. The groups include five participants, plus a trained clinician.

 

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Tolou-Shams, M., Houck, C., Conrad, S.M., Tarantino, N., Stein, L. A. R, & Brown, L. K.  (2011). HIV prevention for juvenile drug court offenders: A randomized controlled trial focusing on affect management. Journal of Correctional Health Care, 17(3), 226-323.

Evaluated Population: Ninety-four adolescents and youth (12 to 18 years old) were recruited from a northeastern juvenile drug court. The sampled youth were 76 percent White, 14 percent African American, 8 percent multiracial, and 2 percent Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander.

Approach: Adolescents and youth were randomly assigned to PATH (n = 29) or the control condition (n = 28), where they received a comparable treatment known as health promotion intervention (HPI). Both of the treatments lasted five weeks, with weekly, two-hour sessions with five participants per group, in addition to a trained clinician and a research assistant.

Data were collected at baseline and at three months after the intervention was completed. Data included lifetime and recent sexual risk behaviors, attitudes and communication with partners regarding condom use, lifetime history of HIV testing, recent substance use, and mental health symptoms.

Results: Only 57 percent of the total study sample completed the follow-up assessment. From baseline to the three-month follow-up, statistically significant positive impacts were found on lifetime HIV testing for both the control and intervention groups. For the total study sample, lifetime HIV testing showed a statistically significant increase, rising from 26 percent at baseline to 74 percent at the three-month follow-up. However, no significant differences were found between the control and intervention groups on any of the measures.

 

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References

Tolou-Shams, M., Houck, C., Conrad, S.M., Tarantino, N., Stein, L. A. R, & Brown, L. K. (2011). HIV prevention for juvenile drug court offenders: A randomized controlled trial focusing on affect management. Journal of Correctional Health Care, 17(3), 226-323.

KEYWORDS: Adolescence (12-17), Youth (16+), Young Adults (18-24), Clinic/Provider-Based, Males and Females (Co-ed), Juvenile Offenders, High-Risk, Counseling/Therapy, Substance Use, STD/HIV/AIDS, Sexual Activity, Condom Use and Contraception, Anxiety Disorders/Symptoms.

Program information last updated 1/14/14