Program

Jan 16, 2013

OVERVIEW

The Osteoporosis
Prevention and Self-Management Course aims to improve confidence and to promote
awareness and self-management of osteoporosis in women. The program
significantly increases the mother’s probability of increasing her child’s
calcium intake.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population:
Mothers from Southern Tasmania, Australia

The Osteoporosis
Prevention and Self-Management Course is a small-group, 8-hour class that
emphasizes factors contributing to risk for osteoporosis and appropriate habits
to minimize that risk. The intervention lasts two hours per week for four weeks.
The program is delivered by a pair of Department of Health and Human Services
allied health professionals, which could include physiotherapists, occupational
therapists, and nurses. Those in both the control and treatment groups received
a leaflet discussing what osteoporosis is and lifestyle factors such as diet,
exercise, smoking, and calcium intake that affect osteoporosis risk.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Winzenberg, T. M., B. Oldenburg, et al. (2006). A Mother-Based Intervention
Trial for Osteoporosis Prevention in Children. Preventive Medicine: An
International Journal Devoted to Practice & Theory 42,
1, 21-26.

Evaluated
Population: 
354 mothers from Southern Tasmania, Australia with a child under
18. The average age of participants was 39 years old. The percentage of mothers’
who worked 0 hours per week in groups 1-4 ranged from four to ten percent. Eight
to 22 percent of the sample had a family history of osteoporosis. Finally, 38-47
percent of the sample had greater than a high school education.

Approach:
Respondents were randomly assigned to one of two conditions. The control
condition included a leaflet with information from Osteoporosis Australia. The
experimental condition was the Osteoporosis Prevention and Self-Management
Course.

The authors
measured bone mineral density feedback, calcium intake, smoking history,
breast-feeding history, number and ages of children, family history of
osteoporosis or fracture or both, fracture history in the subject, education
level, employment status of main provider, employment status of the mother, and
marital status. Subjects’ bone mineral density was measured at the spine and
hip, and received a letter informing them whether they were at risk for
osteoporosis. At pre-test and post-test, mothers reported their calcium intake
as well as information about their children’s calcium intake and physical
activity.

Results:
Relationships between change in children’s behavior and the employment status of
the mother, family history of osteoporosis, or smoking were not significant.

There were
significant differences between women with lower bone mineral density (high
risk) and higher bone mineral density (normal) for increasing children’s calcium
intake in year two. Women with lower bone mineral density were more likely to
increase their children’s calcium intake at year two. Women in the treatment
condition were more likely to increase their children’s calcium intake in year
one and year two than the control group. The program did not impact children’s
physical activity.

SOURCES FOR MORE
INFORMATION

References

Winzenberg, T. M., B. Oldenburg, et al. (2006). A Mother-Based Intervention
Trial for Osteoporosis Prevention in Children. Preventive Medicine: An
International Journal Devoted to Practice & Theory 42,
1, 21-26.

Website: http://www.osteoporosis.org.au/
State offices provide information on self-management programs (to reach your
state office in Australia call 1800 242 141)

KEYWORDS:
Children, Youth, Adolescents, White or Caucasian, Physical Health, Parent or Family Component, Nutrition.

Program
information last updated 7/6/09

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