Program

Jun 11, 2009

OVERVIEW

The Obesity-Focused Active Parenting program is a family-based obesity prevention program for overweight Native American mothers and their young children.  The 16-week pilot program curriculum focuses on teaching mothers how to instill healthy eating and activity behaviors in their preschool children.  The program was provided in the homes of treatment group parents, one-on-one by a trained Native American peer educator.  In an evaluation of the program, mothers and their young children were randomly assigned to one of two study groups:  1) the Active Parenting group, which presented curriculum on general parenting techniques, or 2) the Obesity-Focused Active Parenting group.  Results indicated that there were no significant differences across groups on measures of child nutrition, physical activity, or weight after the intervention, though non-significant trend data suggest positive changes.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population:  Overweight, Native American mothers and their children between the ages of 9 months and 3 years old.

The Obesity-Focused Active Parenting program is a family-based obesity prevention program.  It consists of 16, weekly sessions implemented in the home environment.  The sessions are curriculum-based and focus on a wide range of child obesity topics, including techniques to manage child food intake and encourage physical activity.  Mothers are responsible for using the knowledge gained in these sessions to improve their children’s physical health.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Harvey-Berino, J., & Rourke, J.  (2003).  Obesity prevention in preschool Native-American children:  A pilot study using home visiting.  Obesity Research, 11(5), 606-611.

Evaluated population:  43 Native American mother/child pairs served as the sample for this pilot study and evaluation.  The mean age of the mothers was 26.5 years, and they had, on average, 13 years of education.  Forty-two percent of the mothers worked full- or part-time jobs.  The age range for the children was between 9 months and 3 years, with an average age of 21 months.  Fifty-four percent of the children were male.

Approach:  Each mother/child pair was randomly assigned to receive one of the following two interventions:  1) the Active Parenting program, or 2) the Obesity-Focused Active Parenting program.  Both programs consisted of 16 weekly, home-based information sessions delivered by a trained Native American peer home visitor.  Participants in the Active Parenting intervention group received general parenting curriculum on topics such as child behavior management and creating parent-child bonds.  Participants in the Obesity-Focused Active Parenting program received information focused on preventing child obesity through healthy physical development.  The weight, nutrition, and physical activity of participating children were assessed at baseline and 16 weeks later, immediately following the conclusion of the intervention.

Results:  Results indicated that there were no significant differences across groups on measures of children’s healthy weight, nutrition, or physical activity.  However, two borderline-significant findings were reported.  Children’s weight-for-height and energy intake declined (p = .06) in the treatment group relative to the control group.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References:

Harvey-Berino, J., & Rourke, J.  (2003).  Obesity prevention in preschool Native-American children:  A pilot study using home visiting.  Obesity Research, 11(5), 606-611.

Program categorized in this guide according to the following:

Evaluated participant ages:  9 months to 3 years

Evaluated participant grades:  N/A

Program age ranges in the guide:  Early Childhood

Program components:  Clinic/Provider-Based, Home Visiting, Parent or Family Component

Measured outcomes:  Physical Health

Keywords:  Infants, Toddlers, Preschool, Co-ed, American Indian/Alaska Native, Home-based, Parent Training, Home Visitation, Nutrition, Physical Activity, Weight

Program information last updated on 6/11/09.

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