Program

Oct 08, 2009

OVERVIEW

The
Mentor-implemented Violence Prevention Intervention for Assault-injured Youth
program is designed to reduce aggression, fighting, and re-injury among youth
injured through interpersonal violence. The intervention group received a mentor
and the family received up to three home visits. An evaluation at the 6-month
follow-up period found significant increases on conflict avoidance self-efficacy
and significant decreases on misdemeanor behaviors. However, there were no
impacts on number of fight injuries, number of fights, weapon carrying,
aggression, friend problem behaviors, attitudes about interpersonal violence,
attitudes toward retaliation, social competence, and parent report child
aggression.

DESCRIPTION OF
PROGRAM

Target population: Assault-injured
youth.

The Mentor-implemented
Violence Prevention Intervention for Assault-injured Youth program is designed
to reduce aggression, fighting, and re-injury among violently-injured youth
presenting to an Emergency Department.This mentoring program
incorporates components of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s
(CDC) best practices of youth violence, which include mentoring relationships,
home visitation, involvement of parents, and applying a social-cognitive
approach.

Youth in the
intervention group receive a mentor, who is to meet with the youth at least six
times. Mentors are recruited from a local mentoring organization. Eligible
mentors are between 21 and 50 years of age with a history of working with youth.
Mentors receive extensive training on how to be an effective mentor and how to
follow the curriculum. During the mentoring relationship, mentors receive
supervision from program staff. Mentor-mentee pairings are gender-matched and
most matches are one-on-one pairings.

Mentor-mentee
activities occur in the community, and mentors receive a $240 stipend for their
time and to cover activity expenses. During these visits, mentors and mentees
complete a 6-session, violence prevention curriculum focusing on skills
building. The curriculum is grounded in social-cognitive theory and focuses on
conflict management, problem-solving, weapon safety, decision-making, and
goal-setting. The curriculum also includes interactive activities, role-playing
scenarios, and a pledge to remain nonviolent.

Parents of youth
enrolled in the intervention are offered three home visits from a health
educator. The parent curriculum include sessions reviewing topics covered in the
youth curriculum and sessions on parental monitoring and involvement, based on
the Adolescent Transitions Program curriculum.

EVALUATION(S) OF
PROGRAM

Cheng TL, Haynie
D, Brenner R, Wright JL, Chung S, Simons-Morton B. (2008). Effectiveness of a
mentor-implemented, violence prevention intervention for assault-injured youths
presenting to the emergency department: Results of a randomized trial. Pediatrics, 122: 938-946.

Evaluated
population:
A total of 113 youth 10-15 years of age, and their families, who
presented to two participating Emergency Departments (ED) in the Washington,
DC-Baltimore, MD area with interpersonal assault injuries. Youth enrolled in the
intervention group were, on average, 13 years of age; 66% of intervention youth
were male.

Approach:
Program recruitment occurred in the ED, hospital, or by telephone between August
2001 and August 2004. After completing a baseline assessment in the ED, youth
were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=56) or to the control group
(n=57). Families in both intervention and control groups received case
management services; however, intervention families received this service
through the health educator and control families received this service through
two telephone calls.

Youth were assessed
on a variety of behavioral and attitudinal measures, including: number of
fights, number of fight injuries, weapon carrying, misdemeanor problem behavior,
friend problem behavior, aggression, attitudes about interpersonal violence,
attitudes about retaliation, social competence, and self-efficacy. Families were
provided with incentives after completing the baseline ($20) and 6-month
assessment ($30).

Results: At
the six-month follow-up, the program resulted in increases in conflict avoidance
self-efficacy and significant decreases in the frequency of misdemeanor
behaviors, such as damaging property and stealing from a store. However, there
were no impacts on number of fight injuries, number of fights, weapon carrying,
aggression, friend problem behaviors, attitudes about interpersonal violence,
attitudes toward retaliation, social competence, and parent report child
aggression.

SOURCES FOR MORE
INFORMATION:

References:

Cheng TL, Haynie D, Brenner R, Wright JL, Chung S, Simons-Morton B.
(2008). Effectiveness of a mentor-implemented, violence prevention intervention
for assault-injured youths presenting to the emergency department: Results of a
randomized trial. Pediatrics, 122: 938-946.

For more
information about the CDC’s Best Practices of Youth Violence Prevention, please
see:

Thornton TN, Craft CA,
Dahlberg LL, Lynch BS, Baer. (2002). Best Practices of Youth Violence
Prevention: A Sourcebook for Community Action. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention. Available at:

http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/dvp/bestpractices.htm
.

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Community-based, Parent/family, Mentoring, Home Visiting

Measured outcomes:
Aggression/Violence/Bullying

KEYWORDS: Children
(3-11), Adolescents (12-17), Clinic-based, Community-based, Mentoring, Home
Visitation, High-Risk, Conduct/Disruptive Disorder, Skills Training, Family
Therapy, Life Skills, Parent-child Relationship, Parent Management Skills

Program information last updated 10/8/09.