Program

Jan 23, 2012

OVERVIEW

LifeSkills Training
(LST) is a school-based drug and alcohol prevention program. The elementary
school version is targeted at children in grades 3 to 6. The program teaches
social resistance skills and general personal and social competence skills, and
it aims to affect substance use behavior, attitudes, knowledge, and normative
expectations. The program had the following positive impacts: less smoking,
higher self and peer anti-drinking attitudes, increased substance use knowledge
and decision-making, stress, and communication knowledge, lower peer normative
expectations for smoking and alcohol use, lower teen normative expectations for
smoking, and higher self-esteem at post-test. The program had no impact on
chewing tobacco and drinking behavior, self or peer smoking attitudes, social
skills knowledge, refusal skills knowledge, teen drinking norms, adult smoking
and drinking norms, and risk taking.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target
population:
Elementary school students in grades 3 to 6 are targeted.

LST is a
school-based program designed to reduce drug and alcohol use as well as affect
substance use attitudes, knowledge, and normative expectations. The program
consists of 24 classes, 30-45 minutes each, taught over three years with 8
classes per year for students in grades 3 through 6. Teaching methods include
facilitation and group discussion, cognitive-behavioral skills, modeling, and
practice. Cognitive-behavioral skills are taught using instruction,
demonstration, behavioral rehearsal, feedback, social reinforcement, and
behavioral homework assignments. The program is delivered by teachers. A manual
is available.

EVALUATION OF PROGRAM

Botvin, G. J.,
Griffin, K. W., Paul, E., Macaulay, A. P., (2003). Preventing tobacco and
alcohol use among elementary school students through Life Skills Training. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse, 12(4),1-17.

Evaluated
population:
Elementary school students (N = 1090) from 20 suburban schools
participated. Students were in the 3rd (23 percent), 4th
(40 percent), 5th (32 percent), and 6th (5 percent)
grades. In terms of race/ethnicity, students were white (48 percent), Hispanic
(26 percent), African-American (13 percent), Asian (3 percent), and other or
mixed ethnicity (10 percent). Most (70 percent) were from two-parent families,
and 65 percent of mothers had graduated high school and 24 percent had attended
or graduated college.

Approach:
Schools were randomized to either the intervention group (9 schools, 426
students) or control group (11 schools, 664 students). Data were collected at
pre-test and at one 3-month post-test from the students. Of 1,954 students who
completed the pre-test, only 1,090 (56 percent) completed the post-test, and all
analyses were conducted on the 1,090 students. Compared with the sample of
1,090, students who were only assessed at pre-test were more likely to smoke, to
be non-White, to come from a single parent family, and to have lower parent
education levels. Student outcomes included substance use (cigarette, chewing
tobacco, and alcohol behavior), peer and parental attitudes, normative
expectations (of peers, teens, and adults), student’s own attitudes about
smoking and alcohol, knowledge about smoking and drinking and skills-related
knowledge, risk taking, and self esteem. At baseline, intervention students had
a higher rate of chewing tobacco use, were less likely to be White, and more
likely to be from two-parent families. Data were analyzed at both the student-
and school-level (using school-mean data), separately. However, student-level
analyses did not account for clustering.

Results: For
the student-level analysis, intervention students reported less smoking, higher
self and peer anti-drinking attitudes, increased substance use knowledge and
decision-making skills, stress, and communication knowledge, lower peer
normative expectations for smoking and alcohol use, lower teen normative
expectations for smoking, and higher self-esteem at post-test, compared with
control students. The program had no impact on chewing tobacco and drinking
behavior, self or peer smoking attitudes, social skills knowledge, refusal
skills knowledge, teen drinking norms, adult smoking and drinking norms, and
risk taking. For the school-level analysis, intervention schools had lower
smoking and alcohol prevalence rates, higher mean self and friends’
anti-drinking attitudes, lower peer drinking norms (marginally significant), and
higher mean self-esteem scores at post-test, compared with control schools. All
other results were not significant.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

Website:
http://www.lifeskillstraining.com/

Cost
information:


http://www.lifeskillstraining.com/2012PHP-Price-List.pdf

(The link above
includes information on both the elementary and middle school versions).

Contact
Information

Gilbert Botvin

National Health
Promotion Associates
711 Westchester Avenue
White Plains, NY 10604


lstinfo@nhpamail.com

800-293-4969

References

Botvin, G. J.,
Griffin, K. W., Paul, E., Macaulay, A. P., (2003). Preventing tobacco and
alcohol use among elementary school students through Life Skills Training. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse, 12(4),1-17.

KEYWORDS:
School-Based, Substance Use, Social Skills/Life Skills, Elementary, Skills
Training, Tobacco Use, Alcohol Use, Self-Esteem/Self-Concept, Other Safety,
Suburban, Children, Males and Females, Cost, Manual.

Program
information last updated 1/23/12.