Program

Oct 02, 2009

OVERVIEW

The KindergARTen
Summer Camp program is a summer enrichment program designed to boost reading
achievement among low-income children. Findings of a random-assignment,
intent-to-treat study found improvements on word list scores and reading scores
but no improvement on phoneme segment skills, letter naming skills, or dictation
skills.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population:
Low income, urban students exiting
Kindergarten.

The KindergARTen
Summer Camp program is a 6-week summer program designed to reduce summer reading
loss among low-income children. It is implemented 5 days per week for 7.5 hours
per day – from 7:30 am to 3:00 pm. Each day, students spend almost 3 hours (160
minutes) on learning and practicing literacy skills, and about 80 minutes per
day is spent on science and art activities. Fridays are typically reserved for
field trips to museums, aquariums, and local community events. Class sizes are
limited to 10 students. Breakfast and lunch are served.

Academic
instruction is led by one credentialed teacher and two college student interns.
Interns receive 4 weeks of training on curricula/instruction, assessment,
classroom management, parent involvement, basic first aid, and citizenship/team
building and participate in weekly professional development workshops to provide
real-time support for any issues that arise in the classroom. This program uses
science and art curricula but a manual to guide implementation is not currently
available.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Borman, G.D.,
Goetz, M.E., & Dowling, N.M. (2007). Halting the summer achievement slide: A
randomized field trial of the KindergARTen Summer Camp. Journal of Education
for Students Placed at Risk, 14,133-147.

Evaluated population:
One hundred and twenty eight urban, low-income
students from four schools in Baltimore, MD.

Approach: A
sample was selected by asking principals at four schools to recruit at least 45
students. Students from each school were randomly assigned to the intervention
or to the control group (with a result of 93 intervention students and 35
control students). Pre- and post-test data were collected for measures such as
letter naming fluency, phoneme segmentation fluency, reading, dictation, and
vocabulary.

Results:
Mixed impacts on literacy skills were found. The programimproved word
list scores (a small effect size of .27) and developmental Reading assessment
scores (a small-to-medium effect size of .40). However, the program did not
improve phoneme segment skills, letter naming skills, or dictation skills.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References

Borman, G.D., Goetz, M.E., & Dowling, N.M. (2007). Halting the summer
achievement slide: A randomized field trial of the KindergARTen Summer Camp.
Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, 14,133-147.

Evaluation
Contact
Geoffrey D.
Borman, Ph.D.
Professor, Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, Educational Policy
Studies, and Educational PsychologyUniversity of
Wisconsin-Madison
1161D Educational Sciences Building
1025 West Johnson Street
Madison, WI 53706-1796
Tel: 608-263-3688
Fax: 608-265-3135

Email:

gborman@education.wisc.edu

Program
Contact
Ron Fairchild
Executive Director
Center for Summer Learning
Johns Hopkins University
3105 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21218
Tel: 410-516-6228
Fax: 410-516-6222
Email:

rfairchild@jhu.edu

KEYWORDS:
Black or African American, Kindergarten, Children (3-11), High-risk, Urban,
Summer Program, Educational, Reading, Community-based, Community or Media
Campaign, Co-ed.

Program
information last updated 10/2/09.

 

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