Program

Feb 25, 2010

OVERVIEW

The Kids CAN-BIKE
Festival is a bicycle safety skills development program for children. Two hours
of playground instruction are provided during the festival. The instruction
addresses specific bicycle safety topics: helmet and clothing check, bicycle
check, straight-line riding, shoulder checking, signaling, and stopping and
starting. Children spent approximately 15 minutes at each of the safety
stations. An evaluation at the three-month follow-up found no impacts on any
bike safety behavior or knowledge outcomes.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: School children 8 to 13 years of age.

The Kids CAN-BIKE
Festival is an introductory-level bicycle safety skills program for children.
Two hours of playground instruction are provided during the festival, which
takes place during the afternoon. Safety instructions are administered by
trained and certified professionals. The festival includes six separate stations
that address a specific bicycle safety topic: helmet and clothing inspection,
bicycle check, straight-line riding, shoulder checking, signaling, and stopping
and starting. Children spend approximately 15 minutes at each of the safety
stations. While spending time at each station, children are also taught
important safety information, for example, that zigzagging your bicycle on the
road is a risky behavior.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Macarthur C,
Parking PC, Sidky M, Wallace W. (1998). Evaluation of a bicycle skills training
program for young children: a randomized controlled trial. Injury Prevention,
4:116-121.

Evaluated
population:
A total of 141 4th grade students were enrolled in
the study. The study children were between nine and 10 years of age and were
from the Borough of East York, Toronto, Canada.

Approach:
Six schools were randomized to the Kids Can Bike festival intervention group
(n=73) or the control group (n=68). Children were assessed at baseline and again
at three-months after the intervention on behavior-related bicycle safety
outcomes including: riding in a straight line, coming to a complete stop, and
shoulder checking before making a left turn; children were also assessed on
their knowledge and attitudes such as, “Do you need to wear a helmet if you are
cycling on a bike path?”

Results: At
follow-up, there were no impacts on riding in a straight line, coming to a
complete stop, and shoulder checking before making a left turn. There were also
no impacts on any of the knowledge or attitude measures between the two groups.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

For more
information about the Kids CAN-BIKE program of Canada, please visit:

References

Macarthur C,
Parking PC, Sidky M, Wallace W. (1998). Evaluation of a bicycle skills training
program for young children: a randomized controlled trial. Injury Prevention,
4:116-121.

KEYWORDS: Children
(3-11), Co-ed, School-based, Community-based, Helmet Use, Other Safety

Program
information last updated 2/25/10.