Program

Mar 14, 2007

OVERVIEW

The Keep A Clear Mind (KACM) program is a four-week
take-home drug education program designed for upper elementary school students.
The program contains four weekly sets of activities to be completed by students
and their parents together. An experimental evaluation randomly assigned
students by classroom using a waiting list design. Two weeks after the program,
analyses indicate that both mothers and fathers who participated in the Keep A
Clear Mind program reported significantly greater communication with their
children about how to resist peer pressure related to drug and alcohol use than
parents in the control group and students perceived less drug use among peers;
but no differences were found between the groups on drug-related knowledge or
beliefs, intentions to use alcohol, drugs, or cigarettes, and knowledge and
motivation pertaining to alcohol and marijuana.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: Families
with children ages 8 to 12 years old

Keep a Clear Mind
is an early-intervention drug education program that includes several weekly
lessons aimed at helping students develop skills to refuse the use of drugs
(Werch, 1991). The program is designed so that parents and their upper
elementary aged children work on the activities together and engage in
communication about the effects of drug use. Each lesson contained an
introduction of the topic as well as five activities such as answering
questions about drugs and listing reasons not to use drugs.

EVALUATION(S) OF
PROGRAM

Werch,
C. E., Young, M., Clark, M., Garrett, C.,
Hooks, S., & Kersten, C. (1991). Effects of a take-home drug
prevention program on drug-related communication and beliefs of parents and
children. Journal of School Health, 61(8), 346-350.

Evaluated
population:
511 students from 23 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade selected
from six Arkansas
elementary schools

Approach:
The participants were blocked according to school and grade level and were then
randomly assigned by class to the control or to the treatment group. The
students in the treatment group participated in the Keep a Clear Mind Program
and the students in the control group were placed on a wait list for the
program. The mean age of the student participants was 10.4 years and there were
nearly equal numbers of females (53%) and males (47%). The study also included
the 1,022 parents of the participating children. Student and parent surveys
measuring drug use, beliefs, intentions and knowledge were administered two
weeks before the program began and two weeks after the program was implemented.
The parent survey also measured the extent of child-parent communication about
drug use.

Results: Analysis of pretest surveys showed that there were no significant
differences between the control and treatment groups on variables being tested.
Surveys administered two weeks after the program showed that mothers and
fathers in the treatment group reported significantly more recent and frequent
communication with their children about resisting peer pressure and the effects
of drug use, but there were no significant differences found between the
treatment and control groups on drug-related knowledge or beliefs. In addition,
students in the treatment group perceived less peer pressure to use tobacco and
less peer use of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana then students in the control
group. No significant differences were found between groups on measures of
self-efficacy, knowledge of substances, and intention to use alcohol, tobacco,
and marijuana in the future.

SOURCES FOR MORE
INFORMATION

References

Werch,
C. E., Young, M., Clark, M., Garrett, C.,
Hooks, S., & Kersten, C. (1991). Effects of a take-home drug
prevention program on drug-related communication and beliefs of parents and
children. Journal of School Health, 61(8), 346-350.

Link to program curriculum: http://www.keepaclearmind.com/KACM.html#sthash.PSQ0w4rI.dpuf

KEYWORDS: Middle Childhood (6-11), Elementary School,
Parent or Family Component, School-based, Education and Cognitive Development,
Life Skills Training, Substance Use, Illicit Drugs, Marijuana Use, Alcohol Use,
Tobacco Use, Communication, Peer Pressure, White or Caucasian, Self Efficacy

Program
information last updated 
3/14/07

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