Program

Nov 08, 2010

OVERVIEW

The
Inner-City Asthma Study is a randomized trial for children with asthma that
educates and demonstrates how to reduce environmental allergen exposure. An
evaluation of the study showed a reduction in unscheduled clinic visits and
inhaler use, but there was no impact on scheduled medical visits, emergency
department visits, hospital admissions, length of hospital stay, or use of
anti-inflammatory medications.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target
Population:

Children
age 6-11 with moderate to severe asthma

Over the
course of approximately five home visits in 12 months, environmental counselors
lead six modules educating and demonstrating how to reduce exposure to dust
mites, smoking, cockroaches, pets, rodents, and mold. Each module is customized
to the child’s environmental risk and skin test sensitivity. Environmental
counselors are high school graduates from the local community. Along with the
home visits, families also receive an impermeable mattress and pillow covers.
Families with children exposed to environmental tobacco smoke receive a
high-efficiency particulate air filter.

In 2001
dollars, the intervention is estimated to cost $1,469 per family. Cost
effectiveness results were mixed. The intervention was found to be
cost-effective for children with more frequent symptoms, but not for children
with more unscheduled clinic visits or hospitalizations..

EVALUATIONS OF PROGRAM

Kattan,
M., Stearns, S. C., Crain, E. F., Stout, J. W., Gergen, P. J., Evans, R.,
Visness, C. M., Gruchalla, R. S., Morgan, W. J., OConnor, G. T., Mastin, J. P.,
& Mitchell, H. E. (2005). Cost-effectiveness of a home-based environmental
intervention for inner-city children with asthma. Journal of Allergy and
Clinical Immunology, 116
, 1058-1063.

Evaluated
Population:

Nine-hundred and thirty-seven children aged 5 to 11 years with
moderate-to-severe asthma from seven urban locations in the United States
participated in this study.

Approach:
Children
residing in one home for at least five nights per week with at least one
hospitalization or two unscheduled asthma visits to a hospital were eligible for
the study. Children were randomly assigned to receive the intervention or be
placed in a no-treatment control group. At two years, children were assessed on
clinic visits, emergency department visits, hospital admissions, length of
hospital stay, and pharmaceutical use.

Results:
Relative
to control group children, intervention group children were 19 percent less
likely to make unscheduled clinic visits and 14 percent less likely to use
beta-agonist inhalers. There were no impacts on scheduled medical visits,
emergency department visits, hospital admissions, length of hospital stay, or
use of anti-inflammatory medications.

SOURCES
FOR MORE INFORMATION

Inner City
Asthma Study Homepage:


http://www.icasweb.org/

References:

Kattan,
M., Stearns, S. C., Crain, E. F., Stout, J. W., Gergen, P. J., Evans, R.,
Visness, C. M., Gruchalla, R. S., Morgan, W. J., OConnor, G. T., Mastin, J. P.,
& Mitchell, H. E. (2005). Cost-effectiveness of a home-based environmental
intervention for inner-city children with asthma. Journal of Allergy and
Clinical Immunology, 116
, 1058-1063.

KEYWORDS: Children, Males and Females, Urban, Home-based, Parent/Family Component, Cost
Information is Available, Health Status/Conditions, Other Physical Health

Program
information last updated on 11/8/10.

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