Program

Feb 23, 2010

OVERVIEW

Impaired Minds
Produce Actions Causing Trauma (IMPACT) is a hospital-based program targeting
adolescents to prevent injuries caused by engaging in high-risk behaviors,
including consumption of alcohol and/or drugs. An evaluation of the program
found impacts on knowledge at the one-week, one-month, and six-month follow-up
periods. There was an impact on influencing family and friends about road safety
at the one-week follow-up period, but no impacts at the one- and six-month
follow-up periods. There were also no impacts on negative driving behaviors at
any of the follow-up periods.

DESCRIPTION
OF PROGRAM

Target
population:
Adolescents

Impaired Minds
Produce Actions Causing Trauma is primarily a hospital-based program targeting
adolescents to prevent injuries caused by impairments through consumption of
alcohol and/or drugs. Using a multidisciplinary approach, the program is led by
a volunteer team of nurses, physicians, police officers, paramedics, and social
workers. During the program, participants are walked through the various stages
of medical care for trauma patients, and program staff members share their
personal experiences with trauma patients as they interact with participants.
Six components comprise the program: drug awareness; trauma presentation; mock
resuscitation; ICU bedside visit; trauma victim presentation; and follow-up
debriefing.

The program
relies on portraying reality-based situations, rather than preaching to
participants. The program begins with staff from the boards of education and
police departments providing presentations to increase participants’ awareness
of drugs and their consequences, including the legal consequences of drinking
and driving and signs of impairment. The Injury Prevention Educator visits
schools and provides a trauma presentation focusing on the consequences of
high-risk behaviors–such as drinking and driving. On the following day,
participants visit an emergency department and witness a mock resuscitation and
are then provided with a presentation to increase participants’ awareness of
risk of a vehicular crash and injury and decrease their perceptions of
invulnerability. Following the emergency department, participants visit the
bedside of trauma patients to see the short- and mid-term consequences of risk
taking and injury. Next, participants meet with a trauma victim and discuss the
short-, mid-, and long-term consequences of injury; this meeting provides a
personalized account of someone’s injury and its consequences. And finally, one
day after the program, a trauma social worker leads a follow-up debriefing with
participants to reinforce messages from the program and to answer any questions.

Apart from
healthcare professionals, the program costs approximately $50,000 (in
2002-2003), which covers program coordination, volunteer incentives, as well as
other costs.

EVALUATION(S)
OF PROGRAM

Stewart TC,
Polgar D, Girotti MJ, Vingilis E, Caro D, Corbet BA, Parry N (2009). Evaluation
of an Adolescent Hospital-based Injury Prevention Program. Journal of Trauma,
66:1451-1460.

Evaluated
population:
A total of 269 11th grade students enrolled in seven
schools in Thames Valley, Ontario, Canada, participated in the study. The mean
age of participants was 16 years and approximately one-half had some type of
driver’s license. There was a statistically significant difference in the
percentage of boys enrolled in the intervention group compared with the control
group; however, gender was controlled for in the regression analyses when
assessing programmatic impacts. There were no statistically significant
differences between the intervention and control group in terms of their driving
characteristics (time with license, driving frequency, previously taken a
driver’s education program).

Approach:
The program randomly assigned participants to the intervention group (n=129) or
to the control group (n=140). Participants completed a questionnaire at four
points in time: baseline, as well as one week, one month, and six months after
the intervention. Using validated instruments, questionnaires measured
demographic characteristics, driving and license information, negative driving
behaviors, driving infractions, alcohol and drug use, alcohol-related crash
experience, and drinking and driving knowledge, attitudes, perceptions, and
behaviors.

Results:
There were significant impacts on crash and impairment knowledge at the
one-week, one-month, and six-month follow-up periods. There was an impact on
reporting they tried to influence family and friends about road safety at the
one-week follow-up period (effect size=.36), but no impacts at the one- and
six-month follow-up periods. There were also no significant impacts on negative
driving behaviors at the one-week, one-month, and six-month follow-up periods.

SOURCES FOR
MORE INFORMATION

For more
information about the IMPACT program and its history, please visit:


http://www.lhsc.on.ca/About_Us/Trauma/Trauma_Prevention_Programs/IMPACT/index.htm


http://www.lhsc.on.ca/About_Us/Trauma/Trauma_Prevention_Programs/IMPACT/Program_History.htm

References

Stewart TC,
Polgar D, Girotti MJ, Vingilis E, Caro D, Corbet BA, Parry N (2009). Evaluation
of an Adolescent Hospital-based Injury Prevention Program. Journal of Trauma,
66:1451-1460.

KEYWORDS:
Adolescents (12-17), Youth (16+), Clinic-based, School-based, Seatbelt Use,
Alcohol Use, Marijuana/Illicit/Prescription Drugs, Any Substance Use, Co-ed,
Cost

Program
information last updated 2/23/10.

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