Program

Aug 21, 2014

OVERVIEW

Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) is a home-visitation program designed to teach parents how to enhance preschool-age children’s school readiness. Home visits are conducted by paraprofessionals and are complemented by group meetings for parents. Results from an experimental evaluation indicate that participation in HIPPY leads to sustained cognitive and academic impacts in children.

PROGRAM INFORMATION

Target population: Families with 4- and 5-year-old children

The Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) is a home visitation program for families with 4- and 5-year-old children that is designed to teach parents how to enhance the school readiness of their children by engaging them in educational activities. Parents who participate in HIPPY receive home visits by paraprofessionals, attend group meetings, and are provided with books and activity packets to use with their children for 15 minutes each day. The activity packets are designed to improve language and critical thinking skills.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Baker, A. J. L., Piotrkowski, C. S., & Brooks-Gunn, J. (1999). The Home Instructional Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY). The Future of Children, 9(1), 116-133.

Baker, A. J. L., Piotrokowski, C. S., & Brooks-Gunn, J.  (1998). The effects of the Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) on children’s school performance at the end of the program and one year later. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 13(4), 571-588.

Baker, A. J. L., & Piotrkowski, C. S. (1996). Parents and children through the school years: The effects of the Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters. New York, NY: National Council of Jewish Women Center for the Child.

Evaluated Population: Two cohorts of families from a large city in New York State were recruited for participation in the experimental evaluation. Families were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (Cohort I=37 families, Cohort II=47 families) or a control group (Cohort I=32 families, Cohort II=66 families). While children in both the treatment and control groups participated in a high-quality preschool program, only children in the intervention group received the HIPPY services.  A plurality of children who participated in the study were Latino/Hispanic (31 percent), followed by Black/African-American (25 percent), White/Caucasian (24 percent), and other (19 percent). Additionally, one-third of the families reported public assistance was their primary source of income, and 35 percent of families did not speak English as their primary language.

Approach: Data were collected at the beginning of the HIPPY program (pretest), at the end of the program year (posttest), and one year after participating in HIPPY (follow-up). Children’s cognitive skills were assessed at pretest and posttest, and data on their achievement in reading and mathematics, and classroom adaptation were collected at posttest and at follow-up.

Results: Results from Cohort I indicate that participation in HIPPY significantly and positively impacted children’s cognitive skills at post-test (d=.63), classroom adaptation at post-test (d=.69), standardized reading scores at one-year follow-up (d=.75), and classroom adaptation at one-year follow-up (d=.68). In contrast, no significant impacts of participation in HIPPY were identified in Cohort II.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

Link to program curriculum: http://www.hippyusa.org/the_hippy_model_curriculum.php

References:

Baker, A. J. L., Piotrkowski, C. S., & Brooks-Gunn, J. (1999). The Home Instructional Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY). The Future of Children, 9(1), 116-133.

Baker, A. J. L., Piotrokowski, C. S., & Brooks-Gunn, J.  (1998). The effects of the Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) on children’s school performance at the end of the program and one year later. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 13(4), 571-588.

Baker, A. J. L., & Piotrokowski, C. S. (1996). Parents and children through the school years: The effects of the Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters. New York, NY: National Council of Jewish Women Center for the Child.

KEYWORDS: Children, Kindergarten, Preschool, Males and Females (Co-ed),  Home-based, Home Visitation, Clinic or Provider Based, Parent or Family Component, Reading/Literacy, Mathematics, Academic Achievement, Parent-child Relationship, Manual.

Program information last updated 8/21/14

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