Program

Nov 04, 2011

OVERVIEW

An HIV infection prevention intervention was developed for use in Mexican high
schools. The intervention is based on life skills and follows the guidelines of
the UN program on HIV/AIDS for effective school based programs and includes an
optional 2-hour emergency contraception module. The intervention had a
significant impact on students’ knowledge of HIV but not on their sexual
behavior.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: Mexican adolescents

An HIV infection prevention intervention was developed for use in Mexican high
schools. The intervention is based on life skills and follows the guidelines of
the UN program on HIV/AIDS for effective school based programs. The intervention
consists of 30 hours of class, with half of the time focused on the consequences
of unprotected sex and how to avoid it. Other topics covered include social
pressure and practice with communication, negotiation, and refusal skills. An
optional 2 hour emergency contraception module was also developed that may or
may not be used in conjunction with the intervention.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Walker, D., Gutierrez, J. P., Torres, P., & Bertozzi, S. M. (2006). HIV
prevention in Mexican schools: Prospective randomized evaluation of
intervention. British Medical Journal, 332, 1189-1194.

Evaluated population:
Participants included 10,954 students at baseline, 9,372 immediately after the
intervention, and 7,308 students a year after the intervention. A year after the
intervention participants were 16.7 years of age on average and the sample was
44 percent male.

Approach:
Forty schools in Mexico were enrolled to participate in the study. Ten schools
were randomly assigned to a control group, which consisted of government
mandated sexual education. Fifteen schools were randomly assigned to receive the
HIV education class with condom promotion, and the other 15 schools were
assigned to the same HIV education class with an additional module on emergency
contraception.

Before giving the intervention, teachers completed a 40-hour training, with an
extra two hours of training for those that implemented the emergency
contraception module. The intervention was given over a 15-week period, and took
a total of 30 hours, with an extra two hours for the students who received the
extra emergency contraception module.

Data were collected at three time points: before the intervention, immediately
after the intervention, and a year after the intervention. Participants
completed questionnaires that covered knowledge and attitudes about HIV, AIDS,
and emergency contraception; sexual experience; the use of condoms at first and
most recent intercourse; tobacco, alcohol, and drug use; compensated sex; social
networks; socioeconomic status; and intention to continue in school.

Results:
After 16 months, the group that received the HIV class with condom promotion
only differed from the control group in the percentage of students who reported
having a partner, with the HIV class female students reporting having a partner
at a higher rate than female students in the control group. Both male and female
students in the HIV class with condom promotion and the emergency contraception
module displayed more knowledge about HIV and emergency contraception than
students in the control group. No differences emerged between the intervention
groups and the control group in regards to using a condom, stopping sex to put
on a condom, making sex conditional on condom use, or being sexually active.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References:

Walker, D., Gutierrez, J. P., Torres, P., & Bertozzi, S. M. (2006). HIV
prevention in Mexican schools: Prospective randomized evaluation of
intervention. British Medical Journal, 332, 1189-1194.

KEYWORDS:
Adolescents (12-17), Youth (16+), High School, Males and Females (co-ed),
Hispanic/Latino, School-Based, STD/HIV/AIDS, Sexual Activity, Condom Use and
Contraception

Program information last updated on 11/4/11.

 

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