Program

Mar 03, 2009

OVERVIEW

The High School Smoking
Prevention Program seeks to reduce the rate of smoking among high school
adolescents through two versions of the program. One intervention focuses on the
social consequences of smoking, and the other intervention focuses on the
immediate and long-term physiological effects of smoking. The treatment program,
focusing on immediate and long-term effects of smoking, was found to reduce
smoking behaviors, as was the program given to the control group, which focused
on long-term effects; however, no differences were statistically significant.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: Tenth grade students.

In
the following evaluation, the authors use two treatment programs to study their
effectiveness on reducing the rate of smoking habits among high school
adolescents. Each program consists of three, one-hour sessions. The social
consequences of smoking curriculum focused on social pressures to smoke,
self-measurements of the immediate effects of smoking, and how to help others
remain or become nonsmokers. The immediate effects of smoking curriculum group
learned about the long-term health effects of smoking, self-measurements of the
immediate effects of smoking, and how to help others remain or become
nonsmokers.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Perry, C. L., M. J. Telch,
et al. (1983). High School Smoking Prevention: The Relative Efficacy of Varied
Treatments and Instructors. Adolescence. 18, 71, 561-566.

Evaluated population: Tenth grade health classes from four high schools in Northern California.

Approach: Twenty classes of 10th
graders were randomly assigned to one of three programs. Schools were randomly
assigned to the teacher-taught or college-student taught conditions. Three
teachers (alone) and four college students (in pairs) taught classes at the high
schools, and staff members from Stanford University and the American Lung
Association monitored all classes for compliance with the programs, provided
materials, and reinforced instructors.

In this study, the long-term
health effects curriculum is viewed as a control because it uses the traditional
health education approach of fear-arousal to deter smoking. Control group
students watched a slide show on the long-term health effects of smoking, made
anti-smoking posters emphasizing health effects, and watched traditional
anti-smoking health education films.

Students reported their
smoking and health behaviors, submitted to carbon monoxide breath tests, and
took surveys of knowledge on smoking. Five classrooms in each of the four
schools were randomly assigned to one of the three conditions. The four schools
were randomly assigned to two instructional approaches; in the first, students
were taught by a classroom teacher and in the second, by college students.
Students were also matched at pre-test and post-test by their anonymous codes.

Results:
No significant, pre-test to post-test impacts were
found in this study.The authors noted that the lack of significant
differences were likely due to the small sample size.

Note: The authors did not use
the unit of random assignment, the classroom for the program, in analyses. They
used the student as the unit of analysis.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References:

Perry, C. L., M. J. Telch, et
al. (1983). High School Smoking Prevention: The Relative Efficacy of Varied
Treatments and Instructors. Adolescence. 18,71, 561-566.

KEYWORDS: Substance Use,
Tobacco Use, High School, Adolescence (12-17).

Program information last
updated 3/3/09

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