Program

Aug 31, 2007

OVERVIEW

Gimme 5 is a multi-component,
school-based dietary intervention for 4th and 5th
graders. The intervention focuses on increasing students’ fruit, juice,
and vegetable consumption. In a random assignment study involving 16
schools, children in schools assigned to implement the Gimme
5 program were compared with children in schools assigned to receive no
intervention. Over the course of the intervention, students from
intervention schools did not reduce their overall intake of fruit, juice, and
vegetables to the extent that students from control schools did. On
average, following implementation of the Gimme 5
program, intervention students consumed 0.2 more servings of fruit, juice, and
vegetables per day than control students. Increased consumption of
vegetables among students from intervention schools accounted for much of this
difference.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: 4th and 5th
grade students

Gimme 5 is a multi-component
intervention designed to increase consumption of fruit, juice, and vegetables
among 4th and 5th grade students. The intervention
includes twelve 45- to 55-minute classroom sessions targeting vegetable
consumption for 4th graders and twelve 45- to 55-minute classroom
sessions targeting fruit and juice consumption for 5th
graders. All classroom sessions are highly interactive and give students
opportunities to prepare and sample healthy snacks. Students are
encouraged to ask for fruits and vegetables at fast-food restaurants, and they
practice asking skills in role plays. Students also set consumption goals
and receive incentives if they reach these goals.

Parents of children involved in the intervention receive a
weekly newsletter and biweekly videotapes, and are provided with assignments to
work on with their children. Parents are also encouraged to attend a
family night at a local grocery store, where they are provided with suggestions
on selecting, storing, and preparing inexpensive dishes featuring fresh fruit,
juice, and vegetables.

This Gimme 5 program is not
related to the Gimme 5 program developed by Nicklas et al.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Baranowski, T., Davis,
M., Resnicow, K., Baranowski,
J., Doyle, C., Lin, L. S., Smith, M., & Wang, D. T.
(2000).Gimme 5 Fruit,
Juice, and Vegetables for Fun and Health: Outcome Evaluation. Health
Education & Behavior, 27
(1), 96-111.

Evaluated population: Nearly 2000 children from 16
elementary schools served as the study sample for this investigation. All
schools were from a southeastern metropolitan area and its suburbs.
Children were predominantly European-American (85%); the remaining 15% were
African American.

Approach: The 16 schools were matched into pairs and
then randomly assigned, within pairs, to the treatment group or to the control
group. Control schools did not implement an intervention. Treatment
schools implemented the Gimme 5 program over the
course of students’ 4th and 5th grade years. Gimme 5 lessons were spaced out over the course of six
weeks each year and were taught by classroom teachers, who received one day of
training on the program.

Students completed baseline measures during the winter of
their 3rd grade year. Measures included 7-day food records and
psychosocial measures. At baseline, no significant differences existed
between students at control schools and students at treatment schools. A
mid-evaluation follow-up was conducted during the winter of students’ 4th
grade year and a post-evaluation follow-up was conducted during the winter of
students’ 5th grade year.

Results: Over the course of the intervention,
students from intervention schools decreased their overall intake of fruits,
juices, and vegetables to a lesser extent than did students from control
schools. On average, following implementation of the Gimme
5 program, intervention group students consumed 0.2 more servings of fruit,
juice, and vegetables per day than control group students. Increased
consumption of vegetables among students from intervention schools accounted
for much of this difference.

Intervention students increased their knowledge of
appropriate fruit, juice, and vegetable consumption to a greater extent than
did control students over the course of the intervention. These students
also increased the frequency with which they specifically asked for fruits,
juices, and vegetables and increased their fruit, juice, and vegetable eating
self-efficacy. Their eating preferences and expectations relating to the
enjoyment of fruit, juice, and vegetable eating did not change significantly,
however.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

Curriculum materials available for purchase at:

<a
href=”http://rtips.cancer.gov/rtips/rtips_download.do?programid=26&topicid=9″>http://rtips.cancer.gov/rtips/rtips_download.do?programid=26&topicid=9

References:

Baranowski, T., Davis,
M., Resnicow, K., Baranowski,
J., Doyle, C., Lin, L. S., Smith, M., & Wang, D. T. (2000).Gimme 5 Fruit, Juice, and
Vegetables for Fun and Health: Outcome Evaluation. Health Education
& Behavior, 27
(1), 96-111.

Keywords:
Middle childhood (6-11), Children (3-11), School-based, Elementary, Middle
School, Physical Health, Nutrition, White or Caucasian, African American or
Black, Urban, Suburban.

Program information last updated on 8/31/07

Subscribe to Child Trends

Short weekly updates of recent research on children and youth.