Program

Nov 04, 2008

OVERVIEW

This program was designed to teach parents and teens about
HIV, AIDS, and other STDs, to improve communication skills between parents and
their teens and to improve teens’ strategies for avoiding and managing
high-risk situations by exposure to educational videos in the home. The
authors note that school-based programs are often less explicit in nature and
do not allow direct interaction between parents and teens, while a home-based
video program allows families to interact and learn together at a degree of
explicitness that feels right to them. The program was administered to
families with 12- to 14-year-old boys and girls, who were not at high risk for
HIV infection. Forty-five families were randomly assigned to either the
experimental or control group. The authors found that following the
120-minute, four-video program, both parents and teens in the experimental
group increased their knowledge of HIV, AIDS, and STDs and their family
problem-solving skills.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: Families with 12- to
14-year-old boys and girls in Roanoke,
Virginia who, at the time, were
not at high risk for HIV infection.

A multi-video program lasting around 2 hours was
administered to families with teens aged 12-14. The videos focus on the
rationale for the program, fact-based information about AIDS transmission and
prevention, family problem solving, teen problem solving, teen assertiveness,
and practice scenarios.

Later implementations of this program include a workbook
that compliments the material presented in the tapes. All versions of this
program strongly encourage families to re-watch certain tapes for additional
practice on the techniques taught.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Winett, R.A., Anderson,
E.A., Moore, J.F., Sikkema, K.J., Hook, R.J.,
Webster, D.A., Taylor, C.D., Dalton, J.E., Ollendick,
T.H., and Eisler, R.M. (1992). Family/Media Approach
to HIV Prevention: Results with a Home-Based, Parent-Teen Video Program. Health
Psychology, 11
(3), 203-206.

Evaluated population: Participants included 49
families with 12- to 14-year-old teens. Eligible families were recruited
through letters sent out by their family physicians, and parties that expressed
interest received a phone call and an informational packet.

Approach:151 families were initially contacted, and
73 agreed to participate in the study. These families were then
stratified by family composition, age and sex of teens, and parent education
before 49 families were randomly selected to participate.

Families received a double-blind, at-home pretest.
Parents in the experimental group families were given a 120-minute, four-video
program and instructed to screen the tapes first, then
view them with their adolescent in several screenings. After the program,
the participants were tested again, but the nature of the post-viewing
questionnaires and the video retrieval procedures made a double-blind procedure
impossible. The participants, however, were tested by the same assessment
team. Of the 49 families randomly assigned, 45 completed a follow-up six
months after the intervention. A 94 percent completion rate was attained.

Results: Parents and teens in the experimental group
were found to have greater increases in their knowledge scores and family
problem-solving ratings, as compared to members of the control group.
These results were maintained at the six month follow-up.

Winett, R.A., Anderson, E.S., Moore,
J.F., Taylor,
C.D., Hook, R.J., Webster, D.A., Neubauer, T.E.,
Harden, M.C. & Mundy, L.L. (1993). Efficacy of a
home-based human immunodeficiency virus prevention video program for teens and
parents.

Evaluated Populations: Participants included 70
families with 12- to 14-year-old teens. Eligible families were recruited
through letters sent out by their family physicians, and parties that expressed
interest received an informational packet.

Approach: 600 families were initially contacted, and
146 agreed to participate in the study. These families were then
stratified by family composition, age and sex of teens, and parent education
before 70 families were randomly selected to participate.

Families were randomly assigned to either a skills-training
intervention group or an information only control group. Both groups received
an in-home pretest. Parents in the skills training group watched a
135-minute, two-tape video program. The first tape focused on program
rationale, current facts and information on AIDS and family problem solving. A
16 page workbook supplemented this tape. The second tape focused on teen
assertiveness and teen problem solving skills and was presented in an MTV-type
format.

Those families in the information only control group viewed
a 40-minute, two-tape program that did not include as detailed instruction,
demonstration or practice on family and teen problem solving compared with the
intervention group. Both groups completed an in-home posttest about two weeks
after the initial pretest. About three months following the study, “booster
workbooks” were sent to all families, with a different format going to the
intervention and control groups. A month later, a final in-home follow-up
assessment was completed by all participating families.

Results: This program found overall positive
results in increasing parent and teen knowledge of HIV, knowledge of problem
solving skills and assertiveness, and the use of family problem solving skills.
Both the intervention and control groups increased their HIV-related knowledge
during the course of the study. Additionally, only families in the
skills-training intervention improved in assessments of problem solving and
assertiveness, and family problem solving.

Among teens, participants in both groups increased in
assertiveness at the posttest, and maintained that through the follow-up.
Although some gains were seen in teen problem solving at the posttest, no
differences were seen between groups regarding teen problem solving by the time
of the follow-up assessment.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References

Winett, R.A., Anderson, E.A.,
Moore, J.F., Sikkema, K.J., Hook, R.J., Webster,
D.A., Taylor, C.D., Dalton, J.E., Ollendick, T.H.,
and Eisler, R.M. (1992). Family/Media Approach to HIV
Prevention: Results with a Home-Based, Parent-Teen Video Program. Health
Psychology, 11
(3), 203-206.

Winett, R.A., Anderson,
E.S., Moore, J.F., Taylor, C.D., Hook, R.J., Webster, D.A., Neubauer, T.E., Harden, M.C. & Mundy, L.L. (1993). Efficacy of a home-based human immunodeficiency virus prevention
video program for teens and parents.

KEYWORDS: Reproductive
Health, STD/HIV/AIDS, Social/Emotional Health and Development, Risky Sex,
Home-Based, Adolescence (12-17), Life Skills Training, Teen Pregnancy.

Program information last updated 11/4/08.

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