Program

Aug 14, 2012

OVERVIEW

Family
Motivational Intervention (FMI) trains the parents of schizophrenic youth who
use marijuana to communicate effectively with their children. It aims to reduce
the schizophrenics’ use of marijuana and other drugs, though it has only been
found to have an impact on marijuana use.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target
population:

Young
adults (16-35) with schizophrenia who use marijuana.

FMI is a
family therapy and parental training program designed to reduce the use of
marijuana among schizophrenics. The training is a combination of Interaction
Skills Training (IST), which is designed for improving communication with
schizophrenia patients, and Motivational Interviewing (MI), which is designed
for talking with drug abusers. Experienced family therapists give 12 group
sessions over a period of six months. In these sessions, they teach the parents
of schizophrenic youth techniques for communicating that are traditionally used
by professional therapists, including: active listening, sending clear signals,
maintaining boundaries, asking open questions, and overcoming resistance.

EVALUATION
OF PROGRAM

Smeerdijk,
M., Keet, R., Dekker, N., van Raaij, B., Krikke, M., Koeter, M., de Haan, L.,
Barrowclough, C., Schippers, G., & Linszen, D. (2011). Motivational interviewing
and interaction skills training for parents to change cannabis use in young
adults with recent-onset schizophrenia: A randomized controlled trial. Psychological Medicine,1-10. doi:10.1017/S0033291711002832

Evaluated
population: 
The study evaluated the training of 97 parents of 75 recently diagnosed
schizophrenia patients. The schizophrenia patients were all prescribed
anti-psychotic medication, had used marijuana at least two days per week in the
previous three months, and had spent at least 10 hours a week with their parents
in the past month. All of the participants lived in the Netherlands and were
between 16 and 35 years old.

Approach:
After
participants were recruited from two psychiatric practices in the Netherlands,
each patient and their parent(s) were randomly assigned to either the
experimental treatment (FMI) or routine family support (RFS). RFS consisted of
individual meetings between the parent(s) and a family therapist.

Researchers measured the patients’ use of marijuana, alcohol, cocaine,
amphetamines, opiates, and psychedelic drugs, both through self-reporting and
urine tests. They also measured the patients’ reported drug cravings and
subjective quality of life. Parental stress was also measured. While patients
and families were aware of which treatment they were receiving, the researcher
who took the measurements was not (single-blind). Measures were taken within
four weeks of the beginning of the treatment and three months after it was
completed (9 months apart).

Results:
There were
significant positive impacts on both the number of days the patients used
marijuana and the amount used, but no significant impact on alcohol or other
drug use. There was also a significant decrease in patient reported craving for
marijuana. There was a marginally significant impact on the number of patients
who had used no marijuana at all between their treatment and the follow-up.
There was no significant impact on the patients’ quality of life.

Compared
with the control group, there was no significant difference in parental stress
levels. Both the control and the treatment significantly reduced parental
stress.

SOURCES
FOR MORE INFORMATION

References

Smeerdijk,
M., Keet, R., Dekker, N., van Raaij, B., Krikke, M., Koeter, M., de Haan, L.,
Barrowclough, C., Schippers, G., & Linszen, D. (2011). Motivational interviewing
and interaction skills training for parents to change cannabis use in young
adults with recent-onset schizophrenia: A randomized controlled trial. Psychological Medicine,1-10. doi:10.1017/S0033291711002832

Contact
Information

M.
Smeerdijk

Department
of Psychiary

Academic
Medical Centre

Meibergdreef 5, 1105 AZ

Amsterdam,
The Netherlands

amsmeerdijk@amc.uva.nl

KEYWORDS:
Youth,
Young Adults, Adolescents, Males and Females, High-Risk, Clinic/Provider-based,
Counseling/Therapy, Parent or Family Component, Family Therapy, Parent
Training/Education, Marijuana/Illicit/Prescription Drugs, Alcohol, Parent-Child
Relationship, Other Social-Emotional Health

Program
information last updated on 8/14/12.

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