Program

Aug 31, 2007

OVERVIEW

Ending Violence is a dating violence prevention program
focused on legal issues. In an experimental study designed to test the intervention’s impact on Hispanic youth, students in
classrooms assigned to receive the Ending Violence curriculum were compared
with students in classrooms assigned to a control group. Immediately
after the intervention, students assigned to receive the Ending Violence
curriculum were significantly more knowledgeable about laws related to dating
violence than were students assigned to the control group. This increase
in knowledge persisted six months after the intervention. The program had
some immediate impacts on acceptance of dating violence and intention to seek
help if involved with dating violence, but these impacts did not persist at the
six-month follow-up. During the follow-up period, intervention students
were not any less likely than control students to be the victims and/or the
perpetrators of dating violence.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: High school students

Ending Violence: A Curriculum for
Educating Teens on Domestic Violence and the Law was developed by Break the
Cycle, a nonprofit organization that offers free legal services to youth
involved in dating violence. Ending Violence teaches youth about
domestic violence, healthy relationships, and legal rights. The
curriculum, taught by lawyers over the course of three one-hour sessions,
stresses that intimate partner violence is illegal. Students learn that
the law protects victims of domestic violence and can punish perpetrators.
Students are also provided with information and resources intended to increase
their help-seeking behavior, if involved with dating violence. Sessions
include videos, discussions, games, and role plays.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Jaycox, L. H., McCaffrey,
D., Eiseman, B., Aronoff,
J., Shelley, G. A., Collins, R. L., & Marshall, G. N. (2006).Impact of a School-Based Dating Violence Prevention
Program Among Latino Teens: Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Trial. Journal
of Adolescent Health, 39
, 694-704.

Evaluated population: 2540 students from ten high
schools in the Los Angeles
United School
District served as the study sample for this
investigation. 92% of students were Hispanic.

Approach: Los
Angeles United School District schools operate on a
track system. Within schools, tracks have separate schedules, student
populations, teachers, and administrators. Each track was assigned to
either the treatment or the control condition. Students in tracks
assigned to the control condition received LAUSD’s
standard health condition. Students in tracks assigned to the treatment
condition received the Ending the Violence intervention. Thee separate
cohorts of students took part in the study.

Ending the Violence was administered over the course of
three consecutive days. All students completed pre-test surveys one day
before the course began and filled out post-test surveys one day after the
course ended. Students were surveyed again six months later.

Results: Immediately following the intervention,
students assigned to receive the Ending Violence intervention knew
significantly more about laws related to dating violence than did students
assigned to the control group. Intervention students were significantly
less accepting of female-on-male dating violence than were control students,
but the two groups did not differ from one another on their acceptance of
male-on-female dating violence. Intervention students were significantly
more likely to report an intention to seek help if involved in a violent
relationship and were significantly more likely to perceive assistance sources
as helpful.

Six months after the intervention, students assigned to
receive the Ending Violence intervention remained significantly more
knowledgeable than control group students about laws related to dating
violence. These students were also more likely to view lawyers as helpful
in dating violence situations. Intervention students did not differ
significantly from control students on acceptance of dating violence, intention
to see help if involved in a violent relationship, or
perception of assistance sources as helpful, however. Intervention
students were just as likely as control students to have been involved in
dating violence victimization and/or perpetration during the follow-up
period.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

More information on Break the Cycle’s
programs available at:

http://www.breakthecycle.org/

References:

Jaycox, L. H., McCaffrey, D., Eiseman, B., Aronoff, J.,
Shelley, G. A., Collins, R. L., & Marshall, G. N. (2006).Impact of a School-Based Dating Violence Prevention
Program Among Latino Teens: Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Trial. Journal
of Adolescent Health, 39
, 694-704.

KEYWORDS: Behavioral
Problems, Aggression, Teen Dating Violence, Adolescents, Hispanic or
Latino, School-Based, High School.

Program information last updated on 8/31/07

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