Program

Jun 04, 2014

OVERVIEW

The Electronic Games to Aid Motivation to Exercise (eGAME) program is intended to promote physical activity, reduce Body Mass Index (BMI) and percentage body fat, and improve cardiovascular fitness in overweight and obese children. An experimental evaluation found that the eGAME program had a statistically significant impact on BMI and percentage body fat at 24 weeks. The impacts for all participants were the same, regardless of ethnicity, gender, and baseline cardiovascular fitness.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: Overweight and obese children who use sedentary video games

The eGAME program is intended to promote physical activity, reduce BMI and percentage body fat, and improve cardiovascular fitness in overweight and obese children. Participants receive a home-based active video game system (Sony PlayStation EyeToy) to use for 24 weeks.

EVALUATION OF PROGRAM

Evaluated Population: A total of322 overweight or obese New Zealand children aged 10-14 years who regularly used sedentary video games participated in the study.  Children were excluded from the study if they already owned active video games or had a medical condition that ruled out performing physical activity. The final sample consisted of 17 percent Maori, 26 percent Pacific, and 57 percent New Zealand European. The majority (73 percent) were male.

Approach: Participants were randomly assigned to either the intervention (N=160) or control group (162).  Children in the control group did not receive the active video game system until the end of the study period.

Assessments were conducted at baseline, 12 weeks from baseline, and 24 weeks from baseline.   Data were collected on BMI and percentage body fat and were measured at all three time points.

Results: The eGAME program had a statistically significant impact on BMI and percentage body fat at 24 weeks, decreasing BMI and percentage body fat in the treatment group compared with the control group. There were no differences among the subgroups, i.e., ethnicity, gender, and baseline cardiovascular fitness.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References

Foley, L., Jiang, Y., Mhurchu, C.N., Jull, A., Prapavessis, H., Rodgers, A, & Maddison, R. (2014). The effect of active video games by ethnicity, sex and fitness: Subgroup analysis from a randomized controlled trial. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 11.

KEYWORDS: Children (3-11), Adolescents (12-17), Males and Females (Co-ed), Home-based, Health Status/Conditions, Obesity

Program information last updated on 6/4/2014.

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