Program

Dec 11, 2007

OVERVIEW

The Early Training Program was designed to influence both
attitudes and aptitude relating to educational achievement. The program
targeted economically disadvantaged pre-school children and targeted both
children and parents. Results of a random assignment evaluation conducted in
the 1960s showed that children in the experimental groups out-performed
children in the control groups on assessments of IQ, receptive vocabulary, word
knowledge, word discrimination, and reading in early elementary school, a year
after the intervention ended. However, some of these findings faded in the
follow-ups.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: 4 to 5 year olds who were
economically disadvantaged

The program involves weekly home visits during the year as
well as a 10-week part-day preschool program during the summer. The program
lasts between 2 and 3 years.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Gray, S.W. & Klaus, R.A. (1970). The Early Training
Project: A seventh-year report. Child Development, 41, 909-924.

Evaluated population: African-American low-income
children in two small southern cities. 61 children in one city were part of the
experimental study. 27 group children in a comparison group were in a
second city.

Approach: The 61 children in the first city were
randomly assigned to one of three groups. The first group received three years
of the Early Training Project which consisted of weekly meetings and a three
summers of the 10-week part-day preschool program. The second group received
two years of weekly meetings and the preschool program (starting the
intervention one year after the first group). The third group received no
intervention treatment. In addition, the 27 children in the comparison group
from the second city received no treatment. For the first three years of the
intervention, children received pre- and post-test assessments during the
summer. Follow-up assessments were given in the fourth, fifth, and seventh
summer. Children were assessed using the Stanford-Binet, the Peabody Picture
Vocabularly Test (PPVT), and the Metropolitan Achievement Test.

Results: Results of the study indicated that, over
the years of assessment, children in the experimental groups performed better
than children in the control group (and the comparison group). Likewise, the
experimental groups outperformed the control group on the PPVT however these
findings faded and were not seen in the seventh summer. For the Metropolitan
Achievement Test, children in the experimental groups outperformed children in
the control group on measures of word knowledge, word discrimination, and
reading at the end of first grade but at the end of the seventh year, the
children only differed on measures of word knowledge and reading.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

Curriculum materials available for purchase at: Not
available

References:

Gray, S.W. & Klaus, R.A. (1970). The Early Training
Project: A seventh-year report. Child Development, 41, 909-924.

KEYWORDS: Home Visitation; Black/African American; Academic Achievement/Grades; Reading/Literacy; Mathematics; Children (3-11); Co-ed.

Program information last updated on 12/11/07

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