Program

Feb 08, 2007

OVERVIEW

Two culturally appropriate STD/AIDS education interventions
were developed for use with African American male adolescents in clinic
settings – one was a short videotape; the other was a brief presentation by a
health educator. In a random assignment study, African American male
adolescents were randomly assigned to receive either the videotape intervention,
the health educator delivered intervention, or standard clinic services.

Adolescents who received the video intervention scored
higher than did adolescents who received standard clinic services on a
post-test measure of sexual knowledge. Adolescents who received the
health educator delivered intervention scored even higher than did adolescents
who received the video intervention. All adolescents had greater
confidence in their ability to use condoms, but adolescents who received the health
educator-delivered intervention reported greater confidence in their ability to
use condoms at post-test than did adolescents who received standard clinic services. During a six-month follow-up period,
however, neither the adolescents who received the video intervention nor the
adolescents who received the health educator delivered intervention practiced
more consistent condom use than did adolescents who received standard clinic
services.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: African American males, aged 15-19

A videotape was developed to promote condom use among
African American male adolescents in clinic settings. The 14-minute
videotape was designed by adolescents in the target population to be culturally
appropriate – it included actors, dress, music, and language suitable for an
African American adolescent audience. The video focused on a message of “We
got to keep the brothers alive” and discussed the risks of STDs and the
benefits associated with condom use. The video also included a
demonstration of the correct way to put on and take off a condom.

A health educator was trained to deliver messages comparable
to those in the video. The health educator followed a 14-minute script
that touched on all the topics covered in the videotape. Having a health
educator deliver the intervention content allowed for each patient to ask
questions about intervention content and to receive feedback as he practiced
placing and removing a condom from a penis model.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Evaluated population: 562 African American males
seeking care at a city health department STD clinic served as the study sample
for this investigation. Males were between the ages of 15 and 19.
Over one-quarter of the subjects had already fathered at least one child.

Approach: Subjects were randomly assigned to the
videotape condition, the health educator condition, or a control group.
Subjects assigned to the videotape condition viewed the 14-minute videotape as
part of their clinic session. Subjects assigned to the health educator
condition engaged in a 14-minute session with an African American female health
educator as part of their clinic session. Subjects assigned to the
control group received the clinic’s standard care and
education program.

All subjects completed baseline questionnaires before
receiving care. Follow-up questionnaires were administered immediately
after subjects received care, one month after baseline, and six months after
baseline.

Results: All subjects showed gains in sexual
knowledge at immediate post-test. Subjects who viewed the videotape
showed greater gains than did control subjects. Subjects who met with the
health educator showed even greater gains than did subjects who viewed the
videotape.

Also, all subjects reported greater confidence in their
condom use abilities at immediate post-test. Subjects who met with the
health educator reported greater confidence than did control subjects.
And, among subjects with a steady sexual partner, subjects who met with the
health educator also reported greater intention to use condoms than did control
subjects.

There were no significant differences between any groups on
frequency of condom use, however. Further, at neither
the one-month or the six-month follow-up did any significant differences
emerge between groups on frequency of sex or number of sexual partners.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References:

DeLamater, J., Wagstaff,
D.A., & Havens, K.K. (2000).The
Impact of a Culturally Appropriate STD/AIDS Education Intervention on Black
Male Adolescents’ Sexual and Condom Use Behavior. Health Education
& Behavior, 27
(4), 454-470.

KEYWORDS: Reproductive Health, STD/HIV/AIDS, Gender-Specific (Male Only), Black or African
American, Clinic-based, Adolescence (12-17), Youth, Young Adulthood (18-24), Education,
Risky Sex, Teen Pregnancy, Urban.

Program information last updated on
2/8/07.

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