Program

Sep 19, 2007

OVERVIEW

Two videos were developed to promote condom use among
college students. The male video featured males discussing condom
use. The female video featured females discussing condom use. In
developing the videos, researchers felt that heterosexual males might respond
more favorably to watching females discuss the virtues of condom use and
heterosexual females might respond more favorably to watching males discuss the
virtues of condom use.

In an experimental study, college students assigned to watch
either video were compared with students randomly assigned to watch no
video. Additionally, comparisons were made between students assigned to
watch the male video and students assigned to watch the female video.

Four months after video-watching, subjects who watched
either video were significantly more confident in their ability to refuse to
have sex without a condom than were subjects who did not watch a video.
Additionally, subjects who watched either video were
significantly more likely to intend to use condoms in the future than were
subjects who watched no video.

Among subjects who engaged in sexual intercourse during the
four-month follow-up period, subjects who watched either video were
significantly more likely than subjects who did not watch a video to have used
a condom the last time they had sex with a regular partner. Subjects who
watched either video were no more likely than subjects who did not watch a
video to have used a condom the last time they had sex with a new or casual
partner, however. Subjects who watched the female video were more likely
to engage in consistent condom use than were subjects who watched the male
video or subjects who watched no video, but this result was only marginally
significant. Results did not vary by the gender of the viewer, however.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: College students

Two videos were developed to promote condom use among
college students. Each video was 30 minutes long and consisted of three
distinct sections. The first section provided introductory information on
HIV. College students’ vulnerability to the infection was emphasized, and
condom use and HIV testing were recommended. The middle section featured
a group of college students discussing condom use. Discussion focused on
how using condoms shows respect for one’s partner and how condom use can be
erotic. The final section included statistics on STD rates, showed a clip
of a couple discussing condom use in the context of an
ongoing relationship, demonstrated correct condom use, and demonstrated the
difficulty of using condoms while intoxicated.

The videos were identical except that the middle section of
the male video featured males discussing condom use and the middle section of
the female video featured females discussing condom use. In developing
the videos, researchers felt that heterosexual males might respond more
favorably to watching females discuss the virtues of condom use and
heterosexual females might respond more favorably to watching males discuss the
virtues of condom use.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Sanderson, C. A. & Yopyk, D. J. A.(2007).Improving Condom Use Intentions and Behavior by
Changing Perceived Partner Norms: An Evaluation of Condom Promotion Videos for
College Students. Health Psychology, 26(4), 481-487.

Evaluated population: A total of 211 heterosexual college
students, including 109 women and 111 men, served as the study sample for this
investigation. 85% of the subjects were white, 5% were Asian, 4% were
black, 4% were Hispanic, and 2% were of other ethnicities. 85% of the
subjects reported having had sex before.

Approach: Subjects were randomly assigned to one of
three groups: the female video group, the male video group, or the wait-list
control group. Subjects assigned to a video group were shown a condom
promotion video. Subjects assigned to the control group were not shown a
video.

All subjects were surveyed at baseline. Subjects
assigned to one of the two video conditions completed a second survey
immediately after viewing the video. All subjects were sent a follow-up
survey four months later. 86% of the subjects completed this follow-up
survey.

Results: Surveys administered immediately after
video-watching revealed that subjects who watched the male video felt
significantly greater self-efficacy for suggesting condom use to a new sexual
partner than did subjects who watched the female video. However, subjects
who watched the female video reported significantly greater intent to use
condoms than did subjects who watched the male video. These results did
not vary by the gender of the viewer.

Four months after video-watching, subjects who watched
either video were significantly more confident in their ability to refuse to
have sex without a condom than were subjects who did not watch a video.
Additionally, subjects who watched either video were significantly more likely
to intend to use condoms in the future than were subjects who watched no video.

Among subjects who engaged in sexual intercourse during the
four-month follow-up period, subjects who watched either video were
significantly more likely than subjects who did not watch a video to have used
a condom the last time they had sex with a regular partner. Subjects who
watched either video were no more likely than subjects who did not watch a
video to have used a condom the last time they had sex with a new or casual
partner, however. Subjects who watched the female video were more likely
to engage in consistent condom use than were subjects who watched the male
video or subjects that watched no video, but this result was only marginally
significant. Once again, results did not vary by the gender of the
viewer.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

Curriculum materials unavailable for
purchase.

References:

Sanderson, C. A. & Yopyk,
D. J. A. (2007).Improving Condom
Use Intentions and Behavior by Changing Perceived Partner Norms: An Evaluation
of Condom Promotion Videos for College Students. Health Psychology, 26(4),
481-487.

KEYWORDS: Young Adulthood (18-24), College Students, Teen
Pregnancy, Reproductive Health, Condom Use, Risky Sex, STD/HIV/AIDS, Education, Skills Training, School-based, Clinic-based,
Provider-based.

Program information last updated 9/19/07