Program

Nov 12, 2012

OVERVIEW

Participants in this intervention discuss HIV risks and prevention with a clinician in addition to receiving standard clinic care.   In a random assignment study, the intervention was compared with standard care.  At the two-month follow-up, both standard care and intervention patients reported having improved their reproductive health behaviors (less sexual activity, fewer partners, and more consistent condom use), but no significant differences were found between groups on any outcome variables.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: High-risk adolescents, youth, and young adults

This physician-delivered HIV-counseling program was developed because some research indicates that adolescents prefer to receive HIV counseling and education from physicians, as opposed to school educators or parents.  This program allows high-risk adolescents to receive individualized information about HIV risks and prevention strategies in addition to standard clinic care.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Mansfield, C. J., Conroy, M. E., Emans, S. J., & Woods, E. R.  (1993).  A Pilot Study of AIDS Education and Counseling of High-Risk Adolescents in an Office Setting.  Journal of Adolescent Health, 14, 115-119.

Evaluated population: Ninety patients in the Adolescent Clinic at an urban children’s hospital in the northeastern United States served as the study sample for this evaluation.  Patients were predominantly female (92 percent) and black (81 percent).  All patients were sexually active and had undergone treatment for at least one sexually transmitted disease.

Approach: Patients were recruited in the winter of 1990 and were randomly assigned to either the standard care condition (n=47) or the intervention condition (n=43).  Patients assigned to the standard care condition were provided with an individualized risk assessment for HIV, counseling on condom use, a brochure on HIV, and they were offered free condoms.  Standard care lasted approximately 10 minutes.  Patients assigned to the intervention condition received standard care and an additional 10 minutes of counseling with a doctor.  During these additional 10 minutes, patients and physicians discussed susceptibility to HIV, HIV prevention, efficacy of condoms, drug use, and HIV testing.  Physicians asked intervention patients more specific questions about recent risk behavior and knowledge of HIV testing and treatment.

Each patient completed questionnaires before seeing his/her physician.  Approximately two months after his/her appointment, each patient was contacted by the physician and completed a follow-up questionnaire (either during a physician visit or over the phone). Outcomes measured include whether a patient had been sexually active; the average number of partners they had per month; and whether they were using condoms; whether they were using drugs/needles; whether they had test positive for a sexually transmitted disease; and whether they had been tested for HIV. At baseline, the intervention group was slightly older (mean 18.1 vs. 17.1), had been sexually active longer, had a greater number of lifetime sexual partners, and had higher rates of prior gonorrhea infection than the control group.

Results: At the two-month follow-up, both standard care and intervention patients reported having improved their reproductive health behaviors.  Patients in both groups reported less sexual activity, fewer partners, and more consistent condom use.  However, no significant differences were found between groups on any outcome variables.  Intervention patients had sex just as frequently as standard care patients, were no more likely to use condoms, were no less likely to have acquired a new STD, had no fewer sexual partners, and were no more likely to have been tested for HIV.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References:

Mansfield, C. J., Conroy, M. E., Emans, S. J., & Woods, E. R.  (1993).  A Pilot Study of AIDS Education and Counseling of High-Risk Adolescents in an Office Setting.  Journal of Adolescent Health, 14, 115-119.

KEYWORDS: std/hiv/aids, Sexual Activity, Clinic/Provider-based, High-Risk, Urban, Counseling/Therapy, Adolescence (12-17), Young Adulthood (18-24), Youth, Black or African American, Condom Use and Contraception.

Program information last updated on 11/06/12.

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