Program

Jan 04, 2012

OVERVIEW

The STD/AIDS intervention aims to influence male condom use by making male adolescents and young adults aware of STD/HIV risk, providing information about condoms, and demonstrating that condoms are easy to use through either a face-to-face health educator or a video. In an experimental evaluation of the programs, researchers found that the interventions had small short-term impacts on condom use knowledge and self-efficacy, with stronger impacts for the health educator treatment group. The intervention did not provide participants with the knowledge or skills to reduce sexual risk behaviors long-term.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROGRAM

Target Population: Sexually active, male African American adolescents

The intervention is primarily based on the Self-Regulation model of illness behavior and has roots in the Health Belief model and Social Learning theory. Its aim is to influence condom use by making male adolescents and young adults aware of STD/HIV risk, providing information about condoms, and demonstrating that condoms are easy to use. The video intervention is a 14-minute video scripted, acted, and filmed by African American male adolescents who present the intervention message through dialogue, lyrics, images, and personal stories. The video is presented in a manner intended to be culturally appropriate and identifiable to the target population. It also aims to elicit feelings of belonging and social responsibility while also addressing the misconception that African American adolescents and youth are not at risk for STDs/AIDS. Additionally, it provides reference group norms supportive of condom use and skills training for condom use. Similarly, the health educator intervention is presented by a young African American woman, working one-on-one with the participant. The health educator script mirrors that of the video and also is 14 minutes long.

EVALUATION OF THE PROGRAM

DeLamater, J., Wagstaff, D.A., & Havens, K.K. (2000). The impact of a culturally appropriate, STD/AIDS education intervention on black male adolescents’ sexual and condom use behavior. Health Education and Behavior, 27(4), 454-471.

Evaluated population: Participants were 562 African American males aged 15 to 19 years, who sought care at a municipal STD clinic operated by the health department in Milwaukee, WI.

Approach: Participants were randomized into three groups: a video treatment group (VT), health educator treatment group (HE), and control group (CT), which received the clinic’s standard care and education program. Self-report data were collected using self-administered questionnaires baseline(pretest), following treatment (post) 30 days after treatment, and six months after treatment. An African American male research associate approached eligible men in the clinic waiting room to participate in the study. After giving informed consent, the participant was randomly assigned to a treatment group and received the appropriate treatment. After the posttest, participants were given 25 condoms and reminded they would be contacted in 30 days for a follow-up survey. One-third of the participants were randomly selected from each treatment group to be told they would be contacted for a six-month follow up survey. Measured outcomes include condom use knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, perceived risk of contracting an STD within the year, sexual activity within the last 30 days, past condom use during sexual activity with steady and casual partners, and estimated frequency of sexual behavior and condom use intentions in next 30 days with steady and casual partners.

Results: At posttest, the HE group had significantly more condom knowledge than the VT group, and both the VT and HE group had significantly more condom knowledge than the CT. Condom self-efficacy was significantly greater for the HE group than the CT participants at posttest, but not at 30 day or six month follow-up. Both interventions had an immediate impact on condom use intentions with steady partners, but HE participants intended to use condoms more than CT participants. Intervention did not have a significant impact on condom use intentions with casual partners. Perceived risk of getting an STD in a year was decreased by the intervention. Condom attitudes were significantly more positive for HE participants than CT. Condom use attitudes and condom use self efficacy were more positive at posttest than those at 30 days or six months later. All participants intended to have sex with more partners and then had sex with on average one more partner in the month after each follow-up. Condom use intentions was the only impact that remained significant over six months.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References:

DeLamater, J., Wagstaff, D.A., & Havens, K.K. (2000). The impact of a culturally appropriate, STD/AIDS education intervention on black male adolescents’ sexual and condom use behavior. Health Education and Behavior, 27(4), 454-471.

KEYWORDS: Adolescents (12-17), Youth (16+), Young Adults (18-24), Male Only, Black/African American, Clinic/Provider-Based, STD/HIV/AIDS, Sexual Activity, Condom use and Contraception

Program information last updated on 1/4/12.