Program

Mar 16, 2007

OVERVIEW

The Woodrock Youth Development Project (WYDP)– initiated in 1991 in Pennsylvania– was a comprehensive,
multi-component program designed to reduce alcohol, tobacco, and drug use among
at-risk elementary and middle school minority students. Program components
include social skills and drug resistance training, mentoring, regular meetings
with teachers, home visits and parenting classes. Experimental evaluations
indicate that participation in the program decreased drug use, and improved
race relations and school attendance.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: At-risk elementary and middle school minority
students

The Woodrock Youth Development Project (WYDP)
initiated in 1991 in Pennsylvania
was a comprehensive, multi-component program designed
to reduce alcohol, tobacco, and drug use among at-risk elementary and middle
school minority students. The program’s approach incorporated educating
participants about substance use, changing norms about substance use, as well
as promoting problem-solving, coping, and refusal skills, and “improving
self-perception by increasing academic achievement and fostering a sense of
cultural pride” (LoSciuto, Freeman, Harrington,
Altman, & Lanphear, 1997, abstract). WYDP program
components included social skill and competence training, and drug-resistance
training, peer mentoring, extracurricular activities (clubs, retreats), regular
meetings with teachers (goal-setting, progress checks), home visits to
participants’ families, and parenting classes. The program is also designed to
improve attitudes about racial/ethnic diversity.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

LoSciuto, L., Freeman, M.
A., Harrington, E., Altman, B., & Lanphear, A.
(1997).
An outcome evaluation of the Woodrock Youth Development Project. Journal of
Early Adolescence
, 17(1), 51-66.

LoSciuto,
L., Hilbert, S. M., Fox, M. M., Porcellini, L., &
Lanphear, A. (1999). A
two-year evaluation of the Woodrock Youth Development
Project. Journal of Early Adolescence, 19(4), 488-507.

Evaluated population: 718 (244 experimental, 474 control) 6- to
14-year-olds in four Philadelphia
schools, from two different cohort years. (Original study sample was 822,
before attrition.) The sample was half female, 45% Latino, 19% white, 12%
African American, 10% Asian, and 2% American Indian.
Control and experimental groups had similar scores on all measured
characteristics.

Approach:For the experimental evaluation, schools in four Philadelphia cities were
randomized to control or experimental conditions.

Results:An interim evaluation
showed that participation in the program led to reductions in drug use for all
ages, as well as increases in self-esteem and interracial relations for younger
participants (6-9 years old). This two-year evaluation indicated that
participation in Woodrock Youth Development led to
significantly lower levels of lifetime and past month drug use, improved
reported race-relations, and increased school attendance.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References:

LoSciuto, L., Freeman, M. A., Harrington, E., Altman,
B., & Lanphear, A. (1997). An
outcome evaluation of the Woodrock Youth Development
Project. Journal of Early Adolescence, 17(1), 51-66.

LoSciuto,
L., Hilbert, S. M., Fox, M. M., Porcellini, L., &
Lanphear, A. (1999). A
two-year evaluation of the Woodrock Youth Development
Project. Journal of Early Adolescence, 19(4), 488-507.

Website: www.woodrock.org

Program
categorized in this guide according to the following:

Evaluated
participant ages: 6-14 / Program age ranges in the Guide: 6-11, 12-14

Program
components: home visiting, mentoring/tutoring, parent or family component,
school-based

Measured
outcomes: education and cognitive development, social and emotional health,
behavioral problems

KEYWORDS:At-Risk,
Elementary School, Substance Use, Alcohol Use, Tobacco Use, Illicit Drug Use,
Middle School, Black or African American, Asian, Hispanic or Latino, American
Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, Academic
Achievement, Social/Emotional Health and Development, Behavioral Problems, Home
Visiting, School- Based, Parent or Family Component, Mentoring, Tutoring,
School Engagement/Attendance.

Program information last updated 3/16/07