Program

Sep 08, 2011

OVERVIEW

SHARP is a
single-session HIV prevention intervention that uses lecture, videos, group
discussion, and interactive activities to provide STI/HIV knowledge, increase
condom use, and reduce sexual risk-taking and alcohol use among adolescents in
juvenile justice facilities. An experimental evaluation of the program found
mixed impacts on condom use and no impacts on frequency of intercourse while
drinking. When combined with group motivational interviewing, SHARP was
effective at increasing condom use.

DESCRIPTION
OF PROGRAM

Target population: Adolescents detained in a juvenile justice facility

SHARP is a
single-session HIV prevention intervention lasting approximately four hours. The
intervention makes use of lecture, videos, group discussion, and interactive
activities to provide STI/HIV knowledge, improve condom use, and reduce sexual
risk-taking and alcohol use. Participants are encouraged to set long-term goals
that utilize the knowledge and skills learned from SHARP. The program is
delivered in gender-segregated groups of no more than ten adolescents (the ideal
number is three to five per group). SHARP is delivered in juvenile justice
settings by masters-level clinicians gender-matched with participants.

The program
developers offer a two-day training seminar located at the University of New
Mexico. Information about pricing and scheduling is available from Dr. Angela
Bryan at

abryan@unm.edu
.

A program package
is available for purchase from Sociometrics. The package includes training
materials, program materials, measurement instruments, and one year of technical
support.

EVALUATION(S)
OF PROGRAM

Bryan, A.D., Schmiege, S.J., Broaddus, M.R. (2009).
HIV risk reduction among detained adolescents: A randomized, controlled trial.Pediatrics, 124, e1180-1188.

Evaluated population: The sample consisted of
484 adolescents who were detained in short-term juvenile justice facilities.
Eighty-three percent of participants were male and the mean age was 15.8 years.
The ethnic composition of the sample was 37 percent Caucasian, 29 percent
Hispanic, 13 percent African American, 13 percent Biracial/ Mixed Ethnicity, 5
percent Native American, 4 percent Asian, and 2 percent Other. Ninety-three
percent of the sample reported ever having had intercourse and 91 percent
reported drinking alcohol in the past year.

Approach: This evaluation included three
conditions: an information-only control, the SHARP intervention, and SHARP plus
motivational interviewing (“enhanced intervention”). Groups of adolescents were
randomly assigned to a condition on the morning of their intervention session.
Information on condom use and alcohol use was collected at baseline and 3, 6, 9,
and 12 months post-intervention. Alcohol problems, measured by the number of
times in the past year that the participant has experienced problems due to
drinking, were assessed at baseline and the 12-month follow-up.

Results: Adolescents in the information-only
control group significantly decreased their condom use over time, but for
adolescents in the two intervention groups there were no significant changes in
condom use over time. The condom use pattern of the control group was
significantly different from the pattern of the enhanced intervention group and
marginally different (p = .053) from the pattern of the SHARP intervention
group. Additionally, adolescents in the enhanced intervention group used condoms
more frequently than adolescents in the control group at the 6-, 9-, and
12-month follow-ups. Adolescents in the SHARP intervention used condoms more
frequently than adolescents in the control group only at the 6-month follow-up.
The two intervention groups did not differ significantly from each other on this
measure at any time point.

There were no significant differences between groups on
frequency of intercourse while drinking, but all three groups showed significant
decreases over time on this variable. Both intervention groups showed
significant decreases in alcohol problems over time, but the control group did
not. The difference in change in alcohol problems over time between groups was
marginally significant (p = .06).

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

Official Website:

http://www.socio.com/srch/summary/pasha/full/passt28.htm

Contact information:

Angela D. Bryan

University of New Mexico

Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and Addictions

Department of Psychology

MSC03 2220

Albuquerque, NM 87131


abryan@unm.edu

References:

Bryan, A.D., Schmiege, S.J.,
Broaddus, M.R. (2009). HIV risk reduction among detained adolescents: A
randomized, controlled trial.Pediatrics, 124, e1180-1188.

KEYWORDS: Adolescents (12-17), Youth (16+), Juvenile Offenders, White/Caucasian, Hispanic/Latino, Manual Is Available, Alcohol Use, STD/HIV/AIDS, Condom Use and Contraception, Other Reproductive Health, Males and Females

Program
information last updated 9/8/11.

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