Program

Sep 29, 2009

OVERVIEW

The Case-Management
Program for Academic Enhancement brings together at-risk girls, parents,
teachers, and social workers in order to form a plan and increase girl’s
academic performance and attendance. In this task-centered intervention (Reid,
1978), the girls showed significant improvements in their grades and attendance
at the end of the intervention; however, these impacts were not sustained at the
one-year follow-up.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population:
Girls at risk of school failure

The case-management
program uses a team-based, task-centered approach requiring that the
participating girl, social workers, teachers, and the girl’s parents work
together to find ways to improve school performance. The team meets every other
week during the school semester and focuses on completing tasks such as homework
assignments, making up detention time, and attending classes as a way to
increase performance. Parents are encouraged to facilitate and monitor homework
and reinforce successful academic performance. Teachers provide extra academic
help to the girls and gather information about helpful resources.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Reid, W. J., &
Bailey-Dempsey, C. (1995). The effects of monetary incentives on school
performance. The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 331-341.

Evaluated
population:
One-hundred and twelve girls in grades 6 through 10 in
Burlington, VT. All girls in the study had problems with grades or attendance.
The girls were white and primarily from low-income families. The median age was
14 years.

Approach:
Students were randomly assigned to a case-management program, a payment program,
or a control group. The payment program provided $50 to girls that increased
their grades. For more information about the monetary incentive program, click

here
. Girls were assessed on grades (measured using GPAs) and absences at
pre-test, post-test, and one-year follow-up.

Results: The case-management group had significantly
higher grades (effect size = 0.51) and lower absences than the control group.
Also, when compared with the payment group, the case-management group had
significantly higher grades. There was no significant difference between the
treatment groups in regard to absences. At the one-year follow-up, there were
no significant differences between any of the three groups.

SOURCES FOR MORE
INFORMATION

References:

Reid, W. J., &
Bailey-Dempsey, C. (1995). The effects of monetary incentives on school
performance. The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 331-341.

 

KEYWORDS:
Adolescents, Middle School, High school, Female, White, High-Risk, School-based,
Academic Achievement, Case Management,

Program
information last updated on September 29, 2009