Program

Resolve It, Solve It

Jul 09, 2013

 OVERVIEW

Resolve It, Solve It is a community- and school-based media campaign designed to reduce violence and aggression. Five rural communities were randomly assigned to the experimental and control conditions. The program was found to have an impact on violent intentions and physical aggression against people, verbal victimization, and perceived school safety, but not self-efficacy, verbal assault, or physical aggression against objects, and only a marginal impact on physical victimization.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: Rising high school juniors and the middle school students in their communities

Resolve It, Solve It is a two year violence prevention campaign that aims to reduce violence among middle school students in the community.

High school juniors complete a week-long media institute at Colorado State University to help to create a violence prevention campaign for their home communities. The media institute teaches the high school students about media advocacy and campaign implementation, as well as the violence prevention topics of anti-bullying, anger management, and conflict resolution. During the media institute, the students plan a year-long media campaign to promote non-violence, including developing three types of public service announcements (print, radio, and television) that are then produced professionally and run in the students’ communities. The messages are designed to promote the following: respect for individual differences, conflict resolution, and positive, prosocial interactions. The team of students at each high school are asked to lead one community-wide activity each year, to display the print PSA’s in the targeted middle schools and in the community, to air the radio and TV spots twice a month, and to lead five to ten school presentations. In addition, promotional items such as key chains and book covers are marketed with the Resolve It, Solve It tagline.

EVALUATION OF PROGRAM

Swaim, R. C., & Kelly, K. (2008). Efficacy of a randomized trial of a community and school-based anti-violence media intervention among small-town middle school youth. Prevention Sciences, 9, 202-214.

Evaluated Population: Rural seventh and eighth graders (N=1,492) in six middle schools in communities in Kentucky, Louisiana, Illinois, Idaho, and California participated in the study. Most were white (67%), followed by African American (10%) and Mexican American (10%), mixed race/ethnicity (7%), American Indian (2%) and other race/ethnicity (2%), Asian or Pacific Islander (1%), and other Latino (<1%) students. Forty-seven percent of students were eligible for free or reduced-price lunch.

Approach: Three communities were randomly assigned to receive the anti-violence media intervention, and two were randomly assigned to the control condition.  Data were collected from seventh and eighth grade students in the community middle schools at baseline, one year into the intervention, and at the end of the intervention on self-efficacy in violence-related situations, violent intentions, violent behavior (verbal assault, physical aggression against objects and physical aggression against people), verbal victimization, physical victimization, and perceived school safety. Students were followed from middle school into high school.

Results: Overall, impacts were found for violent intentions and physical aggression against people, verbal victimization, and perceived school safety. There was also a marginal impact on physical victimization. There was no impact on self-efficacy, verbal assault, or physical aggression against objects.

Subgroup analyses by gender showed that the impact on physical aggression against people only occurred among female students, and that the impact on verbal victimization and perceived school safety only occurred for male students.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

Website: http://anti-violencemedia.com/

References:

Swaim, R. C., & Kelly, K. (2008). Efficacy of a randomized trial of a community and school-based anti-violence media intervention among small-town middle school youth. Prevention Sciences, 9, 202-214.

KEYWORDS: Adolescents (12-17); Youth (16+); Middle School; High School; Co-ed; White/Caucasian; Black/African-American; Hispanic/Latino; Rural; School-based; Community-based; Community or Media Campaign; Aggression; Bullying; Delinquency.

Program information last updated 7/9/13.

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