Program

Positive Parenting and the Pediatric Symptom Checklist

Oct 04, 2010

OVERVIEW

Based in outpatient
pediatric offices, the Positive Parenting program is a telephone based
intervention to educate parents of at-risk children. Parents in the program
receive materials such as videotapes and guidebooks designed to strengthen the
relationship between parent and child. Along with these materials, parents have
weekly 15-30 minute phone sessions with a parent educator. Parents choose areas
of their parenting to focus on from a variety of topics such as respect,
monitoring, and discipline.

The Pediatric Symptom
Checklist is a screening tool used by the pediatric clinics to evaluate children
and adolescents for behavioral and psychosocial problems. The checklist is used
to raise clinicians’ awareness of potential behavioral problems with the
expectation that clinicians will refer at-risk youth to resources which can help
with these problems.

The study below finds
that the use of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC-17) and subsequent
referrals to Positive Parenting interventions were effective in
decreasing parent-reported aggression, delinquency, victimization, and
attentional problems. Reductions were also reported by parents in the areas of
bullying, fighting, and fight-related injuries. There was a reduction in
child-reported instances of being bullied.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Target population: This combination
program targets children and adolescents ages 7-15 who are found to be
at-risk for behavioral and psychosocial problems.

The Pediatric Symptom Checklist is used by clinicians to
help diagnose possible behavioral problems and refer at-risk children and
adolescents to programs which are designed to combat these problems. One of the
programs intended for use in referral by clinicians is the Positive Parenting
program. Parents of children who score as at-risk for behavioral problems on
the PSC-17 are referred to this telephone-based program. Parents receive direct
instruction from educators as well as supplemental materials that aid in the
understanding of effective parenting.

EVALUATION(S) OF PROGRAM

Borowsky, I. W., Mozayeny, S., Stuenkel, K., & Ireland,
M. (2004). Effects of a primary care-based intervention on violent behavior and
injury in children. Pediatrics, 114(4),392-399.

Evaluated population: 224 children who presented at
clinics and tested positive on the PSC-17 psychological screening measuring
internalizing, attentional, and externalizing problems. The youths had a mean
age of 11.2 (SD=2.3) in the intervention condition and 10.9 (SD=2.3) in the
control condition. The sample was 78.3-78.9% white and 12.1-12.6% of families
were receiving welfare.

Approach: When children and adolescents (ages 7-15
years) showed up at 8 pediatric clinics, they were screened using the Pediatric
Symptom Checklist. If they scored positive for emotional or behavioral problems
on the checklist, they were randomly assigned to either a treatment or a control
condition. In the treatment group, clinicians were given the screening
checklist attached to the youth’s medical chart. In the control condition, the
screening checklist was not given. Positive Parenting, a telephone-based
program for parents, was made available to clinicians as a potential resource
for children in the treatment group. Clinicians were asked to note if they made
any mental health services referrals to Positive Parenting, to other
intervention programs, or for follow-up visits for intervention group patients.
A parent educator called parents who were referred to the Positive Parentingprogram and parents received 2 videotapes, a manual for parenting, and 15-30
minute weekly telephone sessions for up to a total of 15 sessions.

Results: Children and adolescents in the treatment
group experienced greater decreases in parent-reported aggressive, delinquent
behavior, and attention problems compared with the control group. There was no
impact on child reports of these measures. Children and adolescents in the
treatment condition also scored lower for parent-reported measures of bullying,
fighting, and fight-related injuries than in the control condition. There was
no impact on child reports of these measures, but there was an impact on child
reports of being bullied. Those in the treatment condition were less likely
than their counterparts to report being the victims of bullying.

SOURCES FOR MORE INFORMATION

References

Borowsky, I. W., Mozayeny, S., Stuenkel, K., & Ireland, M.
(2004). Effects of a primary care-based intervention on violent behavior and
injury in children. Pediatrics, 114(4),392-399.

KEYWORDS: Telephone-Based, Children, Adolescents,
Middle Childhood (6-11), Adolescence (12-17), Aggression, Delinquency, Violence,
Life Skills Training, White or Caucasian, Clinic-Based, Provider-Based, Physical
Health, Social/Emotional Health, High-Risk, Behavioral Problems

Program information last updated 10/4/10

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