Featured Publications

The Complex and Varied Households of Low-Income Hispanic Children

Jan 2015 | Kimberly Turner, Lina Guzman, Elizabeth Wildsmith, Mindy E. Scott

This research brief examines the household composition of low-income Hispanic children, based on our analyses of recent nationally-representative data. We report on the size and structure of low-income children’s households and the employment status of adult household members. We also explore variation in these patterns by whether the parents were born in the United States or outside it, in light of the unique challenges that immigrant households may face.

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State of Young Hispanic Children

Nov 2014 | Child Trends

This fact sheet includes information about demographics, education, the family, and the health of Hispanic children.

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Math Scores Add Up for Hispanic Students: States and School Districts Notable for Recent Gains by Hispanic Students in Mathematics

Nov 2014 | Natalia E. Pane

This report shows significant gains in math achievement by Hispanic fourth- and eighth-graders across the nation—the equivalent of one grade level in the last ten years (2003-3013). Using data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, Child Trends reviewed and compared fourth and eighth grade math scores in the nation, states, large cities, and select school districts. The report highlights those regions with top scores and the largest increases.

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Family Structure and Family Formation among Low-Income Hispanics in the U.S.

Oct 2014 | Elizabeth Wildsmith, Mindy E. Scott, Lina Guzman, Elizabeth Cook

This research brief, from the National Research Center on Hispanic Children and Families, provides a national portrait of low-income Hispanic families in the U.S. Having a better understanding of these families will help programs and policymakers in their efforts to assist these families. We use recent nationally-representative data to describe the relationship and childbearing histories of low-income Hispanic men and women aged 15 to 44. Importantly, we distinguish by nativity—i.e., born in the U.S. versus in some other country—as family formation patterns vary greatly by nativity, and these differences are obscured when Hispanics are examined as a whole.

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