High School Students Carrying Weapons

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As of 2013, nearly three in ten high school males reported they carried weapons (such as a gun, knife, or club) in the past 30 days.

Importance

Weapon-carrying among adolescents is associated with an increased risk, within a 12-month period, of injuries requiring medical treatment, repeat/multiple injuries, and injuries requiring hospitalization.[1] Nonfatal injuries associated with firearms, in particular, occurred among 15- to 19-year-olds at a rate of 53 per 100,000 in 2012. And firearms were the sixth leading cause of unintentional death in 2011.[2]

Homicide is the third leading cause of death for teens ages 15 to 19, and the second leading cause of intentional/violence-related deaths for this age group. The rate of intentional death involving firearms was 10 per 100,000 15- to 19-year-olds in 2011. Among homicides of 15- to 19-year-olds in 2011, 85 percent were firearms-related; eight percent were due to a cut or piercing wound.[3]

While many students report that they have carried a weapon in the past month, the proportion of students who report they carried a weapon at school is much smaller: only four percent in 2013.[4]

Trends

19_fig1The proportion of students reporting that they carried a weapon in the past 30 days decreased from 26 percent in 1991 to 17 percent in 1999. Since then, the percentage has not strayed far from the current figure of 18 percent (as of 2013). However, among whites, there was an increase in students carrying weapons between 2011 and 2013, from 17 to 21 percent. (Figure 1) White high school students who carried a gun increased from four to six percent in the same period.[5]

 

 

Differences by Gender

19_fig2High school males are more than three times as likely as females to carry a weapon (28 and eight percent, respectively, in 2013). This difference holds for all racial and ethnic subgroups, as well as at each grade level. (Figure 2) The prevalence of carrying a weapon, however, has declined significantly among both males and females (by 15 and four percentage points, respectively) since 1991. (Appendix 1)

 

 

Differences by Race and Hispanic Origin[6]

In 2013, among male high school students, whites were the most likely to carry a weapon (33 percent), followed by Hispanics (24 percent), and blacks (18 percent). Among female high school students, there were no significant racial differences. (Figure 2)

In the 1990s, black students were significantly more likely to carry weapons than were white students (33 versus 25 percent, in 1991, when the gap was greatest). Although the percentage for Hispanic students was similar to that for white students in 1991, the gap between these groups grew, reaching a peak in 1997. In that year, 23 percent of Hispanic students and 17 percent of white students had carried a weapon in the past 30 days. Since then, however, weapon-carrying among black and Hispanic students has continued to decline, while it has increased among white students in recent years, reversing the earlier trend. (Figure 1)

Differences by Grade

In 2013, there were no statistically significant differences in the prevalence of weapon-carrying by grade-level.

State and Local Estimates

2013 estimates of weapon-carrying among high school students (Grades 9-12) are available for select states and cities from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS): see Table 10

International Estimates

None available.

National Goals

Through its Healthy People 2020 initiative, the federal government has set a national goal to decrease the number of adolescents who carry weapons at school, from 5.6 percent in 2009 to 4.6 percent in 2020. To do this, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encourages violence prevention programs for youth that focus on reducing both physical fighting at school and weapon carrying.

More information available here.

What Works to Make Progress on This Indicator

See Child Trends’ LINKS database (“Lifecourse Interventions to Nurture Kids Successfully”), for reviews of many rigorously evaluated programs, including the following which have been shown to be effective at reducing suicide risk behaviors:

Related Indicators

Definition

Students in grades 9-12 were asked whether they had carried a weapon, such as a gun, knife, or club, on one or more occasions in the 30 days preceding the survey. Estimates do not include youth who were not in school, and therefore are not representative of all youth in this age group.

Students from California, Oregon, Washington, and Minnesota were not included in the survey in any year. Additionally, students from Colorado, Iowa, Indiana, and Pennsylvania were not included in the 2013 survey.

Data Source

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2014). 1991-2013 High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data. Accessed on 8/4/2014. Available at http://nccd.cdc.gov/youthonline/.

Raw Data Source

Youth Risk Behavior Survey

http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dash/yrbs/index.htm

 

Appendix 1 -Percentage of High School Students1 Who Reported Carrying Weapons2: Selected Years, 1991-2013

1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013
All Students 26.1 22.1 20.0 18.3 17.3 17.4 17.1 18.5 18.0 17.5 16.6 17.9
Race/Ethnicity3
Non-Hispanic White 25.1 20.6 18.9 17.0 16.4 17.9 16.7 18.7 18.2 18.6 17.0 20.8
Non-Hispanic Black 32.7 28.5 21.8 21.7 17.2 15.2 17.3 16.4 17.2 14.4 14.2 12.5
Hispanic 25.8 24.4 24.7 23.3 18.7 16.5 16.5 19.0 18.5 17.2 16.2 15.5
Grade
9 27.5 25.5 22.6 22.6 17.6 19.8 18.0 19.9 20.1 18.0 17.3 17.5
10 26.8 21.4 21.1 17.4 18.7 16.7 15.9 19.4 18.8 18.4 16.6 17.8
11 29.0 21.5 20.3 18.2 16.1 16.8 18.2 17.1 16.7 16.2 16.2 17.9
12 21.3 19.9 16.1 15.4 15.9 15.1 15.5 16.9 15.5 16.6 15.8 18.3
Male 40.6 34.3 31.1 27.7 28.6 29.3 26.9 29.8 28.5 27.1 25.9 28.1
Race/Ethnicity3
Non-Hispanic White 41.2 33.4 30.6 27.0 28.6 31.3 27.1 31.4 30.3 29.3 27.2 33.4
Non-Hispanic Black 43.4 38.2 29.6 29.1 23.1 22.4 24.9 23.7 24.6 21.0 21.0 18.2
Hispanic 40.0 37.3 36.6 35.0 29.5 26.0 24.3 29.8 28.2 26.5 24.5 23.8
Grade
9 44.4 39.0 33.8 33.2 28.7 33.7 26.6 31.6 31.0 27.3 26.6 26.4
10 41.5 32.5 32.4 26.6 30.7 28.4 26.5 30.6 29.3 28.5 26.4 26.4
11 44.0 33.0 32.1 28.8 26.9 28.1 29.2 28.6 27.7 25.6 25.9 30.5
12 33.1 32.6 26.0 23.3 27.3 25.6 25.2 27.6 25.0 26.5 24.1 29.5
1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013
Female 10.9 9.2 8.3 7.0 6.0 6.2 6.7 7.1 7.5 7.1 6.8 7.9
Race/Ethnicity3
Non-Hispanic White 7.5 6.9 5.5 4.4 3.6 5.1 5.5 6.0 6.1 6.5 6.2 8.3
Non-Hispanic Black 23.6 18.9 15.7 14.7 11.7 8.6 9.8 9.4 10.0 7.8 7.5 7.2
Hispanic 12.9 11.5 13.2 9.6 8.4 7.4 8.5 7.8 9.0 7.9 7.5 7.7
Grade
9 10.4 11.1 9.3 10.9 6.5 7.4 8.8 8.1 8.9 7.6 7.6 8.6
10 11.1 9.8 9.3 6.3 7.1 5.4 5.2 7.8 8.1 7.2 6.1 9.2
11 12.9 9.1 7.7 5.7 5.2 5.9 6.8 6.1 6.0 6.3 6.2 5.9
12 9.5 6.9 6.3 5.3 4.8 5.3 5.2 6.2 6.2 6.4 7.1 7.5
1 Estimates do not include youth who dropped out of school and therefore may not reflect total national values. Students from California, Oregon, Washington, and Minnesota were not included in the survey in any year. Additionally, students from Colorado, Iowa, Indiana, and Pennsylvania were not included in the 2013 survey.2 One or more times during the 30 days preceding the survey.

3Race/ethnicity estimates from 1999 and later are not directly comparable to earlier years due to federal changes in race definitions. In surveys conducted in 1999 and later, respondents were allowed to select more than one race when selecting their racial category. Estimates presented only include respondents who selected one category when choosing their race.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2014). 1991-2013 High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data. Accessed on 8/4/2014. Available at http://nccd.cdc.gov/youthonline/.

Endnotes


[1]Pickett, W., Craig, W., Harel, Y., Cunningham, J., Simpson, K., Molcho, M., et al. (2005). Cross-national study of fighting and weapon carrying as determinants of adolescent injury. Pediatrics, 116(6), e855-e863.

[2]National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. (2014). Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS).   Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars/index.html

[3]Ibid.

[4]Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2014). 1991-2013 High School Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data. Accessed on 8/6/2014. Available at http://nccd.cdc.gov/youthonline/.

[5]Ibid.

[6]Hispanics may be any race. Totals for whites and blacks in this report do not include Hispanics.

 

Suggested Citation:

Child Trends Databank. (2014). High school students carrying weapons. Available at: http://www.childtrends.org/?indicators=high-school-students-carrying-weapons

 

Last updated: August 2014

 

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